Communication a huge and confusing melting pot


Everybody in communication business talks about it everywhere! The new and ever-changing communication landscape has turned the media industry on its head. The confusion is now complete. Much of what we have learned and become accustomed to is no longer valid. This applies particularly to media, journalism, public relations, marketing, and sales. The professionals within each of these fields are either desperately holding on to their old identities, or are groping around for new ones.

The role of journalists is questioned. Previously clear concepts such as “journalist” and “journalism” have become blurred. The same goes for “media”. What is a media today? And “PR” … what is PR? It’s obviously something else today than it was yesterday. And what about “marketing”…

“Markets (and marketing) are conversations” as the Cluetrain Manifesto puts it. Conversations are based on relationships. Just like PR. Because PR’s is all about relationships, right? It’s all about relationships with both the market and those who influence it, including journalists. However, since all consumers now have access to almost exactly the same “tools” and methods as traditional journalists, it seems like the market has in some way also become the journalists. The market represents a long tail of new journalism and new media that perhaps has the greatest influence on a company’s market and might perhaps be their key opinion leaders. “Put the public back to public relations!” as Brian Solis put it long ago.

People have started to talk to each other in social media at the expense of, or sometimes in tune with, traditional media. They’re no longer writing letters to editors. They would rather publish their news ideas directly on the Web. Media consumption, and production, publishing, packaging and distribution in particular, have rapidly moved in to the social web. And both the PR and Marketing communicators are following, or are at least gradually beginning to do so.

As the market moved to the web, and the web has become social, marketing communication has become “social” too. Companies have started to talk directly with their market. And I mean “talk”, not pushing out information. Campaigns with no social component become fewer and fewer. “Monologue” ad banners, with decreasing CTR and increasing CPC, are becoming less acceptable. Google revolutionized with Adwords, Adsense and PPC. Press releases written by former journalists synchronized with Adwords and presented as text ads, turned things upside down.

Aftonbladet has been very successful with advertorials where only a small ad-mark distinguishes the ad from an article produced by journalists. This method is about as successful – and deceptive – as “product placement” in TV and film. That method has gone from small product elements in parts of a program to a complete sellout of the entire series or film. (In Sweden, think Channel 5’s Room Service and TV4’s Sick Sack.) But what can the television business do when the consumer just fast-forwards past the commercials, or worse still, prefers looking at user-generated TV like YouTube?

What will newspapers do when consumers ignore their banners? They will convert advertising into editorials. Or vice versa: they will charge for editorial features and charge companies to publish content on their platform, without involving any “investigative” journalism.

IDG calls their version of this “Vendor’s Voice”, a medium where companies publish their “editorial material” (it used to be called press information) directly on IDG.se and its related websites. The service is conceived and hosted by Mynewsdesk. It works pretty much like the Apple App Store; it is possible for any media to set up their “channel” (the media) on Mynewsdesk, promote it, and put a price on its use.

Essentially, when companies publish their information in their own newsrooms via Mynewsdesk, they can also easily select any relevant channels for the information in question. The service still has the internal working title “Sponsored Stories”, which today may seem a little funny when that is the exact same name Facebook uses for its new advertising program, where a company pays for people in its network to share information about that company with their own friends.

Isn’t that pretty much what PR communicators strive for? It’s in the form of an ad, but this type of advertising is simply bought communication – just like some PR seems to be – with the purpose to “create attention around ideas, goods and services, as well as affect and change people’s opinions, values or actions…”

But the press release… That’s information for the press, right? Or is it information that is now a commodity, often published in the media, directly and unabridged, much like the “sponsored stories”? Maybe it is information that can reach anyone that might find this information relevant. They might not be the press, but they are at least some kind of journalist, in the sense that they publish their own stories, often in same media as “real” journalists, in platforms created for user-generated content.

Everything goes round and round: side by side are readers, companies and journalists. All collaborate and compete for space and reach.

The causal relationship is as simple as it is complicated. People are social. People are using the Web. The Web has become social. People meet online. The exchange is rich and extensive. The crowd has forced the creation of great services for production, packaging, processing and distribution. These are exactly the same building blocks that have always been the foundation for traditional journalists and the media’s right to exist. Strong competition has emerged, but there is also some  interaction and collaboration.

People have opted in to social media at the expense of the traditional media. They rely on their own networks more and more, which has forced advertisers to find a place in social media too. Traditional ads are replaced by social and editorial versions that are designed to engage or become “friends” with your audience, talking to them as you would talk to friends.

The media are in the same boat and are becoming more social and advertorial. Users are invited to become part of both the ads and the editorials. UGC (user-generated content) is melded with CGC (company-generated content) and even JGC (journalist-generated content). Journalism goes from being a product to being a process characterized by “crowd-sourcing”, before ringing up the curtain on a particular report or story. As the newspaper Accent writes on their site:

“This is a collection of automated news monitoring that we use as editors. The idea is that even you, the reader, will see and have access to the unsorted stream of news that passes us on the editorial board. Please let us know if you find something important or interesting that you think we should pick up in our reporting. ”

This is similar to how companies today present their increasingly transparent and authentic communication in their own social media newsrooms, where the audience is invited to contribute their own experiences and opinions, and partly acts as a source of story ideas for journalists.

All in all, it’s a wonderful, fruitful, but oh-so-confusing melting pot.

People 2.0 shot Mubarak down


I had a speech yesterday for Svenska PR-företagen in Stockholm, Sweden. I talked about the ever-changing media landscape and what that means for the PR industry. I told the audience it’s not about web 2.0, it’s all about people 2.0, which is a powerful combination of the the social web and people. Exactly what we now see in #Egypt.

“Yesterday, after 17 days of protests, former Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak gave a speech to the Egyptian government that made it seem like he would not be stepping down.” says Techcrunch. And like Alexia Tsotsis, I do think the fall of Mubarak was the combination of these to factors; people and the social web.

Alexia Tsotsis, Techcrunch, says:

“Pulling a country of 82 million people, around 17 million Internet users, 60 million cellphone subscribers, 7 million home phones, and 5 million Facebook users offline essentially created the largest flashmob ever, with around 8 million protesters in the streets across Egypt today according to reports. Says Zohairy, “Shutting down the Internet was the most stupid move this regime has taken. It gave the revolution huge media attention that wouldn’t have been possible otherwise.””

But, indeed, most of all it’s about people and their call to action. As Devin Coldewey wrote in Techcrunch aswell:

“Twitter and Facebook are indeed useful tools, but they are not tools of revolution — at least, no more than Paul Revere’s horse was. People are the tools of revolution, whether their dissent is spread by whisper, by letter, by Facebook, or by some means we haven’t yet imagined.”

But unlike Devin, I do think that the social web is a tool of revolution, even if tons of revolutions did appear without that, for an example the fall of the Berlin wall in German.

Take a few minutes to take part of that moment of history and compare that to what happened with Mubarak:

Flera marknader = flera konton?


Idag skriver Fritjof Andersson, från “Social Business”, ett inlägg om “Varför ditt företag ska ha flera, nischade konton på Twitter”. Fritjof menar att “om du har ett nischat konto som ger intressenten just den information hen vill ha, rätt paketerad och vid intervall som intressenten gillar – då lyssnar hen. Om du har många oilka produkter eller verksamhetsområden och kommunicerar alla dem via samma konto till flera olika målgrupper så måste kunden själv filtrera informationen, vilket gör den till mindre intressant brus“.
Fritjof skriver att “om du till exempel följs på Twitter av en person som följer 2000 andra konton, men inte är med på den personens twitterlistor, då finns du inte för den personen. Om du däremot har ett nischat konto som ger personen exakt det hen vill ha så kanske, kanske du kvalar in till listan av konton som personen faktiskt lägger tid på att läsa“.

Mina erfarenhter är att ju mer du anpassar dina budskap efter din målgrupp desto mer jobb, men samtidigt desto större chans att målgruppen får den information de önskar. Var gränsen går kan bara du avgöra.

Det mesta bygger förstås på att du känner och förstår din målgrupp. När det gäller Twitter så kan du ju inte välja dina följeslagare. Men du kan ju med fördel välja ut din målgrupp bland såväl dina följeslagare och som alla twitteranvändare i stort. Du kan med fördel välja ut de följeslagare du finner intressanta, följa dem och lära känna dem, genom att engagera dig i det dem har att säga. Och du kan självklart också följa dem du finner intressanta trots att de inte följer dig, kanske i någon förhoppning om att de en dag också väljer att följa dig.

Däremot vill jag inte på rak arm säga att det alltid är “bättre” med fler konton än färre. Jag brukar säga att man får det man förtjänar. Väljer du att skriva om ett nischat ämne, på ett nischat språk, så kommer du med största sannolikhet attrahera en nischad målgrupp. Postar du få och ointressanta tweets, så kommer få att följa dig. Släpper du många ointressanta tweets så kommer ingen annan än din mamma att följa dig. Släpper du några intressanta tweets så kommer du få några följeslagare. Släpper du många intressanta tweets så blir de fler. Börjar du engagera dig i dina följeslagare och ge riktigt bra feedback, så kommer de snart börja älska dig, och du kommer få fler och fler följeslagare.

Är ditt företag verksam inom fler mer eller mindre nischade områden, på fler mer eller mindre nischade marknader, så kan företaget göra klokt i att “borra sig ner” i varje enskild marknad. Genom att tillsätta dedikerade twittrare som sakkunnigt och engagerat kommunicerar om exakt det ämne marknade är interesserad av på dess eget språk, både innehållsmässigt och språkligt. Kanske via flera olika konton. Det kommer förmodligen att ge massor, men också kosta massor.

På MyNewsdesk brottas vi lite med dessa frågor också. Till skillnad från Twitter så skiljer vi på konto och marknad. Vi har skapat förutsättningar för företag att administrera ett eller flera pressrum med ett och samma konto. Exempelvis så har Norwegian, med ett och samma konto, förlagt pressrum till fem olika länder (geografiska marknader) där de är verksamma. De har valt att jobba med för varje enskild marknad dedikerade presskontakter och anpassad information på marknaden språk. Exempelvis finsk information på finska från finsk presskontakt, dessutom taggad i finska geografiska regioner och ämnen. OSV.

Norwegian har skapat pressrum för fem olika marknader/länder.

Norwegians finska pressrum

Ett annat exempel är KGK, som valt att bryta ner sin kommunikation på varumärkesnivå, där man med ett och samma konto skapat pressrum för varje enskilt varumärke, men ändå visat att de ligger under moderbolaget KGK Holding. För varje varumärke har man en dedikerad presskontakt, bilder, pressmeddelanden, nyheter, osv.

KGK har skapat pressrum för varje enskilt varumärke - och knutit dessa till moderbolaget KGK Holdings eget pressrum.

Ett av KGK's varumärken - Hella - har fått ett eget pressrum med för målgruppen dedikerad information och presskontakt.

Båda dessa företag har ansträngt sig till det yttersta för att tillgodose sina målgruppers intressen vad det gäller skräddarsydd information och kommunikation. Vilket har kostat i tid och engagemang, men också givit mycket tillbaka.

Men vi har även många exempel på föreag som finns på många olika marknader, men ändå valt att jobba med ett “one size fits all”-koncept. Samma pressrum, pressmeddelanden, presskontakter, nyheter, bilder, osv, på samma språk för alla. Kostar inte så mycket men kanske heller inte ger så jättemycket tillbaka.

Exakt vilken strategi ditt företag ska jobba utifrån, kan bara ni själva avgöra.

PR-kommunikation om Steve Jobs fick välja


I ett blogginlägg ifrågasätter digitale PR-rådgivaren Tor Löwkrantz PR-kommunikation som bara bygger på det kommunikatören vill säga istället för vad hans publik vill höra.

Tor menar att PR-kommunikation inte sällan handlar om att trycka ut budskap om något, som enligt kommunikatören, handlar om något stort och viktigt som har hänt. Ex:

“Världsledande supermojängen ger oöverträffade möjligheter att tillgodogöra användaren försprång i varje utmaning genom att sammanföra befintliga kärnkompetenser…”

Tor kan själv konstatera att denna typ av kommunikation är värdelös för att inte säga skadlig (om jag tolkat honom rätt).

Tor menar att “Ingen bryr sig överhuvudtaget om vår supermojäng. Vi är oviktiga för de flesta. Ingen väntar på att svälja vårt budskap”, och syftar sannolikt på sig själv som PR-rådgivare. Och drar själv slutsatsen att alla PR-kommunikatörer bör “tala på publikens villkor”. Och inse att det sällan handlar om “mottagare” och “målgrupper” som per definition bara passivt tar emot, utan just om kommunikation mellan människor på bådas villkor.

Jag håller med Tor i mångt och mycket, men inte i allt. Jag håller med dig om att framgångsrik kommunikation måste tillgodose alla inblandades behov och önskemål, och på så sätt bygga på alla berördas villkor.

Men jag håller inte med dig om att ingen bryr sig om supermojänger. Folk älskar supermojänger. Många älskar att få höra spännande berättelser om supermojänger. Folk älskar att passivt konsumera historier om supermojänger utan att aktivt behöva bidra.

Men folk hatar i allmänhet skryt om supermojänger. Folk hatar tråkiga, och irrelevanta historier om supermojänger. Folk ogillar folk som bara pratar utan att lyssna. Folk ogillar självupptagna människor som pratar om sig själva utan att fråga.

PR-kommunikatörer är inget undantag.

Därför gör PR-kommunikatörer, liksom alla männsikor, oklokt i att trycka upp sin målgrupp i ett hörn (inbox) med självupptagna, skrytsamma, tråkiga, irrelevanta budskap utan att först varken lyssna eller förstå.

Men desto klokare i att först lyssna och förstå sin omgivning, och med utgångspunkt från det, förse sin omgivning med kul, intressanta historier, utan att kräva att den aktivt ska delta i någon form av konversation, men vara öppen och mottaglig för konversation, om så önskas.

Slutligen finns det ett stort värde i att överraska. För folk vet inte alltid vad de vill ha. Det är därför Steve Jobs aldrig gör marknadsundersökningar. Eller som Henry Ford sa i samband med att han lanserade T-Forden: “Hade jag frågat folk vad de ville ha, så hade de sagt en snabbare häst”.

Båda deras “supermojänger” blev en skräll. Och om de jobbat som PR-kommunikatörer, så kanske de skulle gjort samma sak, som de gjorde som grundare av två av världens största bolag, tillika intressantaste supermojänger.

De skulle ha haft en egen idé vad som är bra och dåligt, gjort verklighet av den bästa idén, och släppa den där folk enkelt och effektivt kunde hitta den.

Kritik mot Facebooks Sponsrade nyheter


Jag gillar inte Facebooks nya social ads i form av sponsrade nyheter. Lika lite som jag gillade deras första sociala annonsprogram “Beacon”. Frågan är om jag någonsin kommer gilla den typen av program. För jag har också svårt för Tupperwarepartyn. Och känner avsmak inför Buzz Agents.

Men vad har de gemensamt? Alla använder “vänner” som kommersiella budbärare. Och det gillar jag inte!

Facebooks nya sociala annonsprogram “Sponsrade nyheter” funkar som så att när dina vänner “gillar”, checkar in på, eller delar med sig av annan information från företag på Facebook, som också är anslutna till annonsprogrammet ifråga, så visas aktiviteten inte bara i dina vänners nyhetsflöden, utan även som en annons i spalten längst till höger.

Bild: InsideFacebook

Facebook säger sig ha testat detta under några månader, och menar på att det givit en massa mervärden till deras kunder (företagen) i form av ökad exponering och varumärkeskännedom.

Facebook hyllar sitt eget nya annonsprogram - Sponsrade nyheter

InsideFacebook skriver:
“Seeing that a friend has checked in at Starbucks is a much more compelling reason to visit than a standard advertisement telling a user to go get a coffee.”

Men vad säger användarna? Borde det åtminstone inte vara opt in på såna här program. Många menar det och somliga anser att Facebooks sponsrade nyheter just är en tam variant av det tidigare och så hårt kritiserade Beacon.

InsideFacebook fortsätter:
“Some users may not want their content turned into ads, and since there’s no way to opt-out or turn off Sponsored Stories, some protest should be expected.”

Räckvidd inget med inflytande att göra


Låt dig inte luras av räckvidd när du söker inflytelserika personer på webben. Personer med stora nätverk behöver inte med nödvändighet ha stort inflytande.

Min pappa sa alltid: “Håll dig god vän med de som sitter längst bak i klassen, för det är hos dem du kommer söka jobb.”

Andemeningen var förstås att göra mig uppmärksam på hur viktigt det är med lite attityd, integritet, bångstyrighet, etc, för att komma någonstans här i världen. Men också för att påvisa värdet av goda relationer med de som har, eller kommer att få, makt och stort inflytande.

Sistnämnda har varit ledorden för de som jobbar med PR ända sen de gamla grekerna. Det som dock förändrats under resans gång är det kommunikativa landskapet, opinionsbildarna, och de kommunikativa metoderna.

De som länge har haft störst inflytande på företags och organisationers marknad är den första, andra och  tredje statsmakten. Sistnämnda – de traditionella medierna – har lite slarvigt uttryckt länge varit synonymt med PR.

Men nu, när vem som helst har fått verktyg att uttrycka sig fritt på webben, talar man om en fjärde statsmakt; den skara människor som plötsligt och sammantaget förmodligen har störst inflytande på företags och organisationers marknad, av dem alla.

Cisions Europachef, Peter Granat, säger i en intervju med PRWeek:

“In the social media era the word ‘influencer’ is fast overtaking ‘journalist’, ‘analyst’ or any other ringfenced descriptive term that we were once comfortable with. Influencers are everywhere and they’re not simply confined to journalists – now we have bloggers, tweeters, podcasters; a constantly changing variety of people to whom PR professionals need to reach out. But finding the right influencers on the right channels that make an impact for our clients’ brands can seem like looking for a needle in a haystack.”

Detta är ju minst sagt omtumlande för Cision och liknande bolag vars intäkter till största del och ännu så länge kommer ifrån försäljning av just tillgång till mediedatabaser och utskick med utgångspunkt från dessa.

Branschen skakas ånyo av en omdaning som får stora konsekvenser på alla inblandades sätt att arbeta med PR. I synnerhet de traditionella PR-verktygen som hittills har utgått från att journalister och redaktioner på traditionell media är de med störst inflytande på marknaden, och de enda som är värda att “bearbeta” för att på så sätt nå och skapa goda relationer med sin marknad.

Bortsett ifrån att företag idag med framgång kan skapa goda relationer direkt med sin marknad utan att gå via opinionsbildare, söker nu dessa företag tjänster som hjälper dem att finna dessa nya och inflytelserika personer.

Jag har tidigare skrivit om hur nära nog samtliga sociala tjänster på webben som kartläggar folks uttryck på webben och resultatet därav, kan ligga till grund för att identifiera folks inflytande på företags marknad. Men också om de tjänster som tagit positionen att bygga gränssnitt mot dessa tjänster med syfte att försöka redogöra för vem som hänger ihop med vad och vilka, vad som sägs, till vem, i vilken omfattning och på vilket sätt.

Plötsligt har vi kommit väldigt långt ifrån de klassiska “mediedatabaserna” och “distributionslistorna”. Dessvärre kvarstår ofta den traditionella synen på att inflytande har med räckvidd att göra; där en journalists inflytande förknippas med sitt medias upplaga/täckning, och där nu personer med stora “nätverk”, anses ha större och bättre inflytande, än de med små nätverk.

Detta är en stort misstag.

Brian Solis skriver “Influence is not popularity and popularity is not influence” i ett blogginlägg i höstas. Och fortsätter:

“Over time, our net worth is measured not by the size of our social graph, but our place within it.  As a result, social capital is visualized as influence. It is influence that shapes the agenda of social communities and the resulting activity and conversations that contribute to their resonance.”

I ett inlägg med rubriken: “Digital PR – Trends from 2010 into 2011” skriver Mark Berrryreid:

“It isn’t always the smart move to go to the blogger with the largest reach.”

Utan poängterar istället vikten av engagemang och entusiasm vad det gäller positivt inflytande:

“Investing in the people  (evangelists) who love your brand will create a ripple effect.”

Om PR-kommunikatörer uteslutande strävar efter att nå och bygga relationer med de som har stora nätverk, så riskerar de att missa de som verkligen har inflytande på deras företags marknad.

Jag gillar Wikipedias definition av “Social Influence”: “Social influence occurs when an individual’s thoughts, feelings or actions are affected by other people.”

Stora nätverk kan lätt konstrueras utan att innehålla ett uns av “social influence”.

Människor som verkligen påverkar andra människor, kanske gör det inom en sfär som är irrelevant för dig och din verksamhet?

Kasey Skala på SocialMediaToday är kritisk till den allmänna uppfattningen att människor med stora sociala nätverk också skulle ha stort inflytande. Han skriver i inlägget “Does online influence matter?” att:

“Mr. Social Media Expert/Consultant/Guru might know a little something about the online space, but does he really have any influence on which brand of cereal I’m going to buy? Absolutely not. Keep in mind, outside your little social bubble, the vast majority of people in the real world have no clue who you are, nor do they care about your opinion.”

Journalisters inflytande härrör ofta till det media de jobbar för, och den status de har på mediet ifråga. Vilket inte på något sätt spegler hur många följeslagare journalisterna ifråga ev har på Twitter där deras tweets inte sällan även rör frågor av privat karaktär, som vida skiljer sig från deras professionella sfär.

Det är därför märkligt att exempelvis Cision listar de mest inflytelserika journalisterna på tjänsten “Journalisttweets” med utgångspunkt från Klout. Klout säger sig kunna mäta just dessa journalisters “inflytande” med utgångspunkt från 35 olika variablar tagna från deras konton på Twitter, och numer även Facebook. Men vad säger egentligen detta om journalisternas verkliga inflytande?

Liksom Kasey så har jag inget ont att säga om Klouts verksamhet, men kommunikatörer som vill skapa relationer med inflytelserika människor inom deras intressesfär gör sig en rejäl björntjänst om de går efter “Klout score”.

Lika förbryllad blir man av det faktum att 61% av de tillfrågade journalisterna i PRWeeks Media Survey 2010 har blivit pitchade på Facebook. För hur många av de 79% journalister (enligt undesökningen) som har ett konto på Facebook, har det av professionella skäl? Och hur många vill bli pitchade den där? Något som inte framgår av undersökningen.

Läs också “Are marketers overestimating the impact of influencers?” och “Your Followers Are No Measure of Your Influence“.

Pressinformation på Facebook – hot eller möjlighet?


Journalister vill inte bli pitchade på Facebook. Det är heller ingen källa till press- eller företagsinformation. Det framgår av PRWeeksMedia Survey 2010 där 43% av de tillfrågade journalsiterna i USA blivit pitchade via sociala nätverk. Trots att de inte vill det.

Information om och från företag säger sig åtminstone dagstidningsjournalisterna hellre få direkt ifrån företagens hemsidor (90%), med hjälp av Google sök (82%), direkt kommunikation med PR-ansvariga (79%) eller från webbaserade pressinformationstjänster (opt in) (36%). Trots det använder 33% av journalsiterna generellt sett sociala nätverk i sin research. Men bara ett fåtal genom att bli ett “fan” verkar det som.

Frågan är om Facebook är rätt plats att för dig som PR-kommunikatör att möta journalister på? Att förmedla sin pressinformation på? Och i så fall hur?

Den klassiska frågan från kommunikatörer nu för tiden är huruvida de ska använda social media i sitt PR-arbete, och i så fall hur?

För många är det närmast en självklarhet, för andra helt otänkbart. Mitt korta och generella svar på frågan är att om du som kommunikatör vill skapa goda relationer med ditt företags marknad (och målgrupp) så bör du först lyssna på den för att förstå dess behov och önskemål. Och sen börja engagera dig när och där du får indikationer på att målgruppen mottaglig för dialog och utbyte.

Det är dock långt ifrån säkert att hela din målgrupp är social på webben, eller ens får information från sociala medier. Och även om den är det, så är det inte alls säkert att den är intresserad av information eller en dialog med ditt företag där, eller någon annanstans. Men eftersom människor idag i allt större utsträckning söker sig till webben för socialt utbyte, inte sällan i sk sociala medier, så är sannolikheten ganska stor att man också kan bedriva framgångsrik PR i dessa sammanhang, trots allt.

Det fina med den sociala webben är att du som PR-kommunikatör på ett betydligt effektivare sätt nu än tidigare kan bygga bra relationer direkt med din marknad, och inte nödvändigtvis via “språkrör” som journalister. ”Put the public back to public relations” som Brian Solis uttrycker det i sin bok med samma namn. Dessutom har alla dina intressenter som väljer att ventilera sina åsikter ett väldigt stort inflytande på varandra.

Men i detta gytter av relationer med inflytande på vandra, har det förmodligen aldrig varit viktigare, och kanske mer gynnsamt, att slå vakt om just dina viktigaste opinionsbildare; de som har störst inflytande på ditt företags marknad.

Journalisten har (fortfarande) ett mycket stort inflytande generellt sett. Så pass stort att man som PR kommunikatör gör klokt i att slå vakt om och tillgodose dessa och andra nyckelpersoners (key influencers) intressen mer än någonsin.

Frågan är vilka behov och önskemål dessa personer har? Frågan är var de finns, var de är mottagliga för information och ev utbyte? När? Och hur?

Även om du som kommunikatör kan konstatera att din marknad finns på Facebook, och att du därför dragit igång en Facebook-sida, så kvarstår frågan huruvida journalisterna och andra av dina viktigaste nyckelpersoner finns och är intresserade av din närvaro där?

Enligt PRWeeksMedia Survey 2010 så har 79% de tillfrågade journalisterna ett konto på Facebook, och 61% av dem har blivit pitchade den vägen. Men hur många är egentligen mottagliga för pitchar i detta sammanhang?

Min tro är att de flesta journalister väljer att endast visa en del av sin profilinformation. Vilket betyder att de endast kan få meddelanden från sina vänner. Således krävs det av dig som kommunikatör att du först bli vän med journalisten för att kunna pitcha henne. Men om man får tro PRweeks undersökning rätt, så vill ingen av de tillfrågade dagstidningsjournalisterna bli pitchade på Facebook. Det framgår när de svarade på frågan: “Vilka av följande media vill du att PR-kommunikatörer använder när de pitchar dig?”


För rent krasst; hur många journalister finns på Facebook av profesionella skäl? Enligt undersökning ovan använder 33% av dem sociala nätverk generellt sett som verktyg för research. Som del av denna research vet jag att en del av dem väljer att bl a följa företag och liknande på just Facebook. Vilket betyder att de måste bli ett “fan” eller “like” som det numer heter. Vilket blir lite knasigt då en journalist som vill “bevaka” ex Sverigedemokraterna på Facebook måste “gilla” dem för att följa dem.

Knasigt blir det också när journalisten inser att företagens uppdateringar ofta är riktad till företagets kunder med budskap anpassade därefter.

För när Chadwick Martin Bailey och iModerate Research Technologies frågade 1.500 personer varför de hade valt att gilla företag på Facebook, så framgår det att majoriteten av företagets “fans” är just kunder, eller liknande.


När PRWeek frågar journalisterna i samma undersökningen “på vilka sätt de vanligtvis får information om ett specifitk företag”, så visar det sig att hela 92% av journalisterna hämtar information från företagen från företagens hemsidor. Ingen önskar få den från Facebook.

Av detta kan man dra slutsatsen att Facebook kan vara ett utmärkt sätt att möta och interagera med sina konsumenter och liknande. Men kanske inte det bästa sättet att nå ut till journalister och liknande.  Men även om det inte är det bästa sättet, så kanske det trots allt finns anledning att erbjuda journalister och liknande det dem efterfrågar även på Facebook. (I synnerhet för det fåtal som nöjer sig med en Facebook-sida som sin hemsida.) För likväl används de sociala nätvärken allt oftare för research.


Journalister önskar bra uppslag till nyheter och reportage; rå och kärnfull information, som snabbt och sakligt svarar på frågorna vad, när, av vem, hur och varför?

En variant, som vilat på MyNewsdesks skrivbord en tid, är att ge dig som PR-kommuniktör möjlighet att synkronisera din befintliga kommunikation med journalister under en dedikerad flik på Facebook-sidan; eget ”rum” för journalister där de får sitt lystmäte tillgodosett enligt ovan.

Pitchengine.com var en av de som först förverkligade den möjligheten. Jag har personligen inga höga tankar om att lägga kommunikation utanför statusuppdateringarna där aktiviteten är som störst, men heller inte negativ, då detta kanske är den hittills bästa lösningen, trots allt.

Ni journalister, PR-kommunikatörer, och liknande – vad anser ni?