Excel doomed as media relations manager tool


Social networking seems to be the best way to find, get in touch, and communicate with your buddies, no doubt about that. 750 million active users on Facebook, and recently a huge investment from Google to win the network battle, says something about that. Millions of discussion forums of all kind. People are truly connected to each other of thousands of reasons. And communities make perfectly sense for millions of people in millions of contexts. Not least professional. PR in particular. Communicators flock to networks, craving for likes and followers. Journalists as well. To meet their audience.

But what’s happening in the business of media relations in this amazing era of communication? Not much! An excel sheet seems to be the main tool for communicators, and journalists refer to their overloaded inboxes.

I had a great meeting with a PR communicator a few weeks ago. We were discussing the best way for her to find and organize her contacts. And not least get in touch and exchange experiences with them.
My prejudices became incorporated. She was working with an excel sheet. And as far as I’ve understood it is more of a rule than an exception. A wild guess says that 8 out of 10 of PR communicators are doing so.

Not the best media relations manager tool in the world - but the most common?

 

I recently run into a post on “The DIY PR blog – handle your own PR” which began with the sentence: “When you are doing your own PR it’s very important to have a system in place to track all of your pitching outreach efforts.” One of these “systems” was:

“Excel spreadsheet – Start an Excel spreadsheet media list to track all of your outreach efforts. You can have different tabs for each type of outlet – one for magazines, one for websites, one of local/regional media, etc. You could even set one up for editorial calendar postings that you find. Be sure to include the outlet, name, email, phone and any other relevant notes. Every time you communicate with someone make note of it in the “notes” column. Then, once a week or once a month (depending on timing of the outlet and your follow-up needs), go through each tab to be sure you are staying on top of it all.

The communicator I met said to me that’s exactly how she was dealing with media relations.

She said to me that she knew the most important journalists, and what they’re covering and writing about. She’s finding her contacts out of basic research of media. She’s making notes about their needs and wants in her sheet, and based on that she’s sharing her stories by phone and e-mail.

She said:
“As a matter of fact media relations isn’t much different from your personal relations; you’re trying to find out who you’d like to play with, and then start contribute with your life experiences based on what you’ve learned they and you have in common; your social objects.”

I said:
“Yeah, I agree, but you don’t organize your personal contacts in an excel sheet, right?

She started to laugh and said:
“Oh no… Facebook is taking care of that.”

We both realize that Excel isn’t primarily a communication tool. Not even assisted with an e-mail client.

So what would be the best place for communicators to keep and organize their most influential contacts like journalists etc? And vice versa.

Newswires like Cision? It says to be “the world’s largest database of media contacts with all of the information you need to uncover the influencers that matter”. Sounds great but the journalists (so called “target group”) are not engaged. Cision is not an engagement platform. It might even be a spam tool if used indiscriminately.
Facebook? Well, communicators (on behalf of their companies) might have a page and/or a group to meet and discuss with their audience (end customers, etc), but when it comes to media relations, they sometimes would like an exclusive exchange with one or a few of their journalist contacts. LinkedIn? Oh yes, that’s a great professional network. But hard to share content, and still linked to you personally.
Salesforce? It’s not a network on both terms, right? Hard to get a proper community with mutual exchange.
Google+? Maybe – we don’t know yet. Easy to synchronize with your G-mail contacts and create different circles of important people. But the communication is still widely open, and not content driven as the communicator often wants it to be.

And so on…

None of these and others seems to completely fit the communicators and journalists needs and wants when int comes to media relations?

What would you say about a network for journalists and communicators to exchange info and experiences with each other on both terms? I’m talking about a service that allows communicators to find their most influential people on the web, add them to their contacts lists, invite them to a network where they can organize them and communicate with them exclusively. Not least – a tool that allows journalists to find, follow, and send requests to their sources? A network based on the community that has been existing for many years, but still have great potential to flourish with new web service technologies.

How do your media relations look like, when it comes to find, organize and communicate with your contacts?

Please – feel free to respond to some questions in this survey. It just take a minute of your time, and I will send you the summary later on.

Facebook vs Twitter as journalistic tool?


Since I wrote the posting below partly about the brand new Facebook page “Journalists on facebook” and finished that part with the sentence: “I’m pretty sure that many journalist now will take the oppertunity to use this possiblity, to get more out of their daily work.” There’s been a lot of buzz regarding Facebook vs Twitter as a journalistic tool.

Justin Osofsky, Director of Media Partnerships at Facebook, says that the page has been created: “to serve as an ongoing resource for the growing number of reporters using Facebook to find sources, interact with readers, and advance stories. And that “the Page will provide journalists with best practices for integrating the latest Facebook products with their work and connecting with the Facebook audience of more than 500 million people.

I believe he’s spot on, but… I do respect the critics. Among other I got an e-mail from Daniel at Newsy.com who recommended me to see the video about the topic Facebook vs Twitter as a journalist tool.

The news anchor Jim Flink at Newsy, says:
“So, could Facebook challenge Twitter in the battle for reporters’ hearts? One blogger says – probably not:
“Twitter allows you to order the account you follow into lists so you can have all the information about one subject on the same feed while Facebook imposes on you the feed of every journalists you will follow, no matter the subject they are working on or they are specialized in.”

Gigom’s Mathew Ingram suggests the company might have to alter its image a bit to make this work.
“…many users still likely think of Facebook as a place to socialize rather than be informed — a place to play games … not necessarily a place where journalists are active. Those things may not be mutually exclusive, but it’s going to take some work to make them feel like they belong together.”

I do agree. But my point of view is that both services has some left to prove to be kick ass tools for journalists, and their audience in particular.

I would say that the biggest headache right now for both this services, within this matter, is that most people has only one newsstream (or wall) for all their interests, topics, networks, etc (discussion in groups excluded). And most of the people is as a matter of fact interested in several topics and member of many communities. Do you really want the latest news from the revolution in Egypt on the same wall as where my cousins birthday party shows up? I don’t. And these lists feature is too… time-consuming. The same applies for Twitter. Ranking system, like Facebook Edgerank, might make the updates more relevant, but doesn’t solve this problem.

Personally, I love my Google RSS Reader with an extensive but careful selection of sources (social networks included)  in combination with Flipboard.

B t w – what happened to the service “LinkedIn for Journalists”? What I can see is pretty much no more… Or it ended up as a tiny group.  And LinkedIn Today…? Well – we won’t start our days with that kind of news aggregator, do we?

To be continued.

First radio reporter using iPhone as primary field recorder


Journalism has truly turned up side down. And I think that’s just great. I just ran into a few great examples of that:

First of all check out the WTOP reporter Neal Augenstein, who has replaced his heavy radio equipment on an iPhone. He’s writing about this interesting change in MediaShift. And it’s truly inspiring. In particular for those who want to go out on the field to cover, create, and distribute remarkable stories direct to their audience. It hasn’t been easier than now.

Neal describes himself in his Twitter bio as follows:
“Believe I’m first major market radio reporter using iPhone as primary field recorder.”

And he says:
“Now, with the Apple iPhone 4 and several apps, I can produce intricate audio and video reports, broadcast live, take and edit photos, write web content and distribute it through social media from a single device.”

“With the VC Audio Pro app from VeriCorder, I can quickly pull cuts, edit and assemble audio wraps, and adjust volumes on a three-track screen similar to the popular Adobe Audition used in many newsrooms. The amount of time saved by not having to boot up the laptop and transfer audio has been my single greatest workflow improvement. The finished report that used to take 30 minutes to produce and transmit can now be done in 10.

This is a rundown of all the key ways he’s using on and with his iPhone.

Neal Augenstein hasn’t a journalist page – yet. But Nicholas D. Kristof has. He’s one of the top journalists that might got inspired of the possibilities that Justin Osofsky, Director of Media Partnerships at Facebook, talking about on the brand new Facebook page “Journalists on Facebook”. The page has been created: “to serve as an ongoing resource for the growing number of reporters using Facebook to find sources, interact with readers, and advance stories.”

Justin says that “The Page will provide journalists with best practices for integrating the latest Facebook products with their work and connecting with the Facebook audience of more than 500 million people.

I was actually one of the first to like that page, now one day later, they are ten thousands of journalists. And all of them are now asked to create professional pages on Facebook, for both reach and interact with their audience, listen to them, work with them, get ideas for articles of them, and so on. Some of them might already have done that, like Nicholas D. Kristof, that already has more than 200.000 “fans”. And some of them also bring their page to their newspapers bylines like Robert Fisk at The Independent. Why not?

I’m pretty sure that many journalist now will take the oppertunity to use this possiblity, to get more out of their daily work. Some of them will be CNN journalists if they haven’t already joined “the Facebook revolution”. And the media itself is no exception… Look at NPR or the very small local news blog Rockville Central.

When I talked to Nick Wrenn, vice president of digital services for CNN International, during the conference Social Media World Forum, in London, he said that Facebook is an equally obvious that common source of information and meeting point. But he would rather emphasize CNN’s iReport and Open Stories as the public Forum for meeting, collaboration, and sharing, between CNN journalists and their audience.

Pressinformation på Facebook – hot eller möjlighet?


Journalister vill inte bli pitchade på Facebook. Det är heller ingen källa till press- eller företagsinformation. Det framgår av PRWeeksMedia Survey 2010 där 43% av de tillfrågade journalsiterna i USA blivit pitchade via sociala nätverk. Trots att de inte vill det.

Information om och från företag säger sig åtminstone dagstidningsjournalisterna hellre få direkt ifrån företagens hemsidor (90%), med hjälp av Google sök (82%), direkt kommunikation med PR-ansvariga (79%) eller från webbaserade pressinformationstjänster (opt in) (36%). Trots det använder 33% av journalsiterna generellt sett sociala nätverk i sin research. Men bara ett fåtal genom att bli ett “fan” verkar det som.

Frågan är om Facebook är rätt plats att för dig som PR-kommunikatör att möta journalister på? Att förmedla sin pressinformation på? Och i så fall hur?

Den klassiska frågan från kommunikatörer nu för tiden är huruvida de ska använda social media i sitt PR-arbete, och i så fall hur?

För många är det närmast en självklarhet, för andra helt otänkbart. Mitt korta och generella svar på frågan är att om du som kommunikatör vill skapa goda relationer med ditt företags marknad (och målgrupp) så bör du först lyssna på den för att förstå dess behov och önskemål. Och sen börja engagera dig när och där du får indikationer på att målgruppen mottaglig för dialog och utbyte.

Det är dock långt ifrån säkert att hela din målgrupp är social på webben, eller ens får information från sociala medier. Och även om den är det, så är det inte alls säkert att den är intresserad av information eller en dialog med ditt företag där, eller någon annanstans. Men eftersom människor idag i allt större utsträckning söker sig till webben för socialt utbyte, inte sällan i sk sociala medier, så är sannolikheten ganska stor att man också kan bedriva framgångsrik PR i dessa sammanhang, trots allt.

Det fina med den sociala webben är att du som PR-kommunikatör på ett betydligt effektivare sätt nu än tidigare kan bygga bra relationer direkt med din marknad, och inte nödvändigtvis via “språkrör” som journalister. ”Put the public back to public relations” som Brian Solis uttrycker det i sin bok med samma namn. Dessutom har alla dina intressenter som väljer att ventilera sina åsikter ett väldigt stort inflytande på varandra.

Men i detta gytter av relationer med inflytande på vandra, har det förmodligen aldrig varit viktigare, och kanske mer gynnsamt, att slå vakt om just dina viktigaste opinionsbildare; de som har störst inflytande på ditt företags marknad.

Journalisten har (fortfarande) ett mycket stort inflytande generellt sett. Så pass stort att man som PR kommunikatör gör klokt i att slå vakt om och tillgodose dessa och andra nyckelpersoners (key influencers) intressen mer än någonsin.

Frågan är vilka behov och önskemål dessa personer har? Frågan är var de finns, var de är mottagliga för information och ev utbyte? När? Och hur?

Även om du som kommunikatör kan konstatera att din marknad finns på Facebook, och att du därför dragit igång en Facebook-sida, så kvarstår frågan huruvida journalisterna och andra av dina viktigaste nyckelpersoner finns och är intresserade av din närvaro där?

Enligt PRWeeksMedia Survey 2010 så har 79% de tillfrågade journalisterna ett konto på Facebook, och 61% av dem har blivit pitchade den vägen. Men hur många är egentligen mottagliga för pitchar i detta sammanhang?

Min tro är att de flesta journalister väljer att endast visa en del av sin profilinformation. Vilket betyder att de endast kan få meddelanden från sina vänner. Således krävs det av dig som kommunikatör att du först bli vän med journalisten för att kunna pitcha henne. Men om man får tro PRweeks undersökning rätt, så vill ingen av de tillfrågade dagstidningsjournalisterna bli pitchade på Facebook. Det framgår när de svarade på frågan: “Vilka av följande media vill du att PR-kommunikatörer använder när de pitchar dig?”


För rent krasst; hur många journalister finns på Facebook av profesionella skäl? Enligt undersökning ovan använder 33% av dem sociala nätverk generellt sett som verktyg för research. Som del av denna research vet jag att en del av dem väljer att bl a följa företag och liknande på just Facebook. Vilket betyder att de måste bli ett “fan” eller “like” som det numer heter. Vilket blir lite knasigt då en journalist som vill “bevaka” ex Sverigedemokraterna på Facebook måste “gilla” dem för att följa dem.

Knasigt blir det också när journalisten inser att företagens uppdateringar ofta är riktad till företagets kunder med budskap anpassade därefter.

För när Chadwick Martin Bailey och iModerate Research Technologies frågade 1.500 personer varför de hade valt att gilla företag på Facebook, så framgår det att majoriteten av företagets “fans” är just kunder, eller liknande.


När PRWeek frågar journalisterna i samma undersökningen “på vilka sätt de vanligtvis får information om ett specifitk företag”, så visar det sig att hela 92% av journalisterna hämtar information från företagen från företagens hemsidor. Ingen önskar få den från Facebook.

Av detta kan man dra slutsatsen att Facebook kan vara ett utmärkt sätt att möta och interagera med sina konsumenter och liknande. Men kanske inte det bästa sättet att nå ut till journalister och liknande.  Men även om det inte är det bästa sättet, så kanske det trots allt finns anledning att erbjuda journalister och liknande det dem efterfrågar även på Facebook. (I synnerhet för det fåtal som nöjer sig med en Facebook-sida som sin hemsida.) För likväl används de sociala nätvärken allt oftare för research.


Journalister önskar bra uppslag till nyheter och reportage; rå och kärnfull information, som snabbt och sakligt svarar på frågorna vad, när, av vem, hur och varför?

En variant, som vilat på MyNewsdesks skrivbord en tid, är att ge dig som PR-kommuniktör möjlighet att synkronisera din befintliga kommunikation med journalister under en dedikerad flik på Facebook-sidan; eget ”rum” för journalister där de får sitt lystmäte tillgodosett enligt ovan.

Pitchengine.com var en av de som först förverkligade den möjligheten. Jag har personligen inga höga tankar om att lägga kommunikation utanför statusuppdateringarna där aktiviteten är som störst, men heller inte negativ, då detta kanske är den hittills bästa lösningen, trots allt.

Ni journalister, PR-kommunikatörer, och liknande – vad anser ni?

Från mediadatabas till nätverk


Efter att ha föreläst vid sex frukostseminarier i Stockholm, Göteborg och Oslo för sammanlagt hundratals kommunikatörer, så är det ett par frågor som sticker ut ur mängden och som de flesta av åhörarna tycks vilja få svar på:

Hur ska jag lyckas identifiera och kommunicera med hela den nya och brokiga skara människor som har inflytande på mitt företags marknad?

Jag svarade att det kanske de varken kan eller bör göra, åtminstone inte hela skaran, då det finns risk för att de då tar sig vatten över huvudet. Men jag rekommenderade följande:

Gör ditt företag extremt tillgängligt och transparent. Se till att all information om förtaget och dess verksamhet når ut i alla relevanta sammanhang, där din målgrupp förväntar sig att den ska finnas, inte minst när de söker efter den. Lyssna på din omgivning, hjälp den, och skapa förutsättningar till självhjälp. Och fokusera dig på den exklusiva skara som har störst inflytande på din marknad.

Beroende på vilken verksamhet deras företag bedriver är en hel del av de sistnämnda sannolikt journalister, men bli inte förvånad om majoriteten av dem återfinns bland deras kunder, branschkollegor, anställda, partners, återförsäljare, leverantörer, m fl.

Ben Cotton på PR-byrån Edelman Digital i London skrev nyligen ett blogginlägg där han tipsar oss om tio gratis verktyg för att finna inflytelserika människor. Gissa en gång om något av tipsen omfattar någon mediedatabas i traditionell bemärkelse? NOT. Tjänsterna är av typen sök och nätverk med webben som spelplan. Och fler tips av liknande slag finns. Jag gillar dem alla, även om några inte funkar i Sverige. Men om jag känner typen Ben rätt, så organiserar han dessa människor i något CRM-liknande system för bearbetning. I bästa fall med några sociala plug in’s. Det gillar jag inte. Jag förordar nätverket framför CRM’et. Dessutom så tycker jag att Ben förbiser en viktig faktor; att den som ger är också den som får. Det räcker inte med att hitta dem, du måste bidra med något. Ben snuddar förvisso vid frågan, när han poängterar vikten av att bara prata med dem som är engagerade och intresserade av dig. Men vaddå “prata”? Utöver Ben m fl’s tips så skulle jag vilja lyfta fram kraften i att förse målgruppen med verkligt värde; intressant och relevant information, tips, hjälp, nyheter, med utgångspunkt ifrån vad du lärt av den. Materialet driver trafik. Bland trafiken finns fans. Några av dem är dina viktigaste opinionsbildare. Vig en del av ditt professionella liv åt att serva dem. Och – gör det i ett nätverk.

Dagens journalistik fortfarande på kräftgång


Dagens journalistik går fortfarande kräftgång i den nya kommunikativa världen. Den slutsatsen kunde vi alla dra efter att nyligen ha arbetat oss igenom en intensiv dag på “The future of journalism” under PICNIC 2010 i Amsterdam.

PICNIC är en årligen återkommande konferens med syfte att ta pulsen på (och sudda ut gränserna mellan) det senaste inom kreativitet, vetenskap, teknik, näringsliv och samhälle. En dag av årets konferens vigdes åt framtidens journalistik, med European Journalism Centre som värd.

En rad mer eller mindre kända profiler inom journalistik och media tog chansen att predika och bolla idéer med en engagerad publik, däribland Jeff Jarvis.

Två kända journalister 😉

 

Sammanfattningsvis kan man konstatera att den framtida journalistiken man pratade om borde vara här för länge sen. För det är nu det händer.

Låt mig bara kort få sammanfatta vad Jeff Jarvis så i sitt anförande. Jeff är som ni vet en blixtrande skicklig journalist som arbetat för ledande dagstidningar som Chicago Tribune, The Guardian, Entertainment Weekly, the New York Daily News och San Francisco Examiner. Idag uppskattad professor på City University of New York’s Graduate School of Journalism med eget spännande mediaprogram. Dessutom välrenomerad bloggare med Buzzmachine och känd för att ha skrivt “What would Google do?”

Jeff säger att nyheter inte är en produkt. Det är en process, som delvis innehåller nyheter. Nyheter var mer av en produkt förut, då de enda som då kunde producera, förpacka och distribuera nyheter var en förhållandevis liten och exklusiv skara journalister och mediehus. Ett centraliserat, kontrollerat och envägskommunikativt oligapol. Inte längre. Nästan.

Idag har gemene man fått tillgång till samma verktyg som journalisterna. Det är bara skolningen som fattas. Vilket inte är odelat negativt. Ordet är fritt. Nyheterna sprids som löpeld över webben, inte sällan i transparensens anda. I beta. Obearbetade och ofullständiga. Men öppna för vem som helst att bidra till; kommentera, komplettera och reflektera över. Kanske sprida vidare. I nätverk.

Jeff menar att mediahusens definition på nyheter är de dem själva producerar. Gemene man har en annan definition: Nyheter är det som är nytt för dem, oavsett vem som bidragit med nyheterna.

Jeff frågar sig: Vilket berättigande till existens har egentligen journalister och mediehus idag? Vilket värde kan de tillföra för att i sin tur erhålla värde? Av vilket slag?

Folk vill veta vad som händer omrking dem just nu? Vilka som är på plats och kan berätta om det som händer just där just nu? Och i synnerhet – vilka av dem de känner och kan lita på?

Jeff menar att nyhetsorganisationer inte är förberedda på detta; att de fortfarande lever i illusionen att de utgör det enda och trovärdiga filtret mot omvärlden.

“Vi kan inte längre räkna med att mediekonsumenter söker sig till oss (nyhetsorgansiationer) för att få senaste nytt. Vi måste försöka delta i nyhetsrprocessen som är ständigt pågående på webben. Vi måste försöka nå ut där folk finns och är mottagliga. Vi måste bli en del av deras nyhetsström. En del av deras nätverk. En del av deras liv. Vi kan inte längre tro att nyhetsprocessen börjar hos oss. Vi har tur om den slutar där, eller om vi ens är en del av den”, framhåller Jeff.

Jeff hänvisar vidare till det samtal Facebook grundaren, Mark Zuckerberg,  hade med en icke namngiven men känd mediemogul.

Mediemogulen frågar Mark något frustrerat: “Hur…. Berätta hur kan vi bygga en “community” så som du gjort?

Mark svarar kort: “Det kan ni inte.”

Men sen lite mer nyanserat:
“Ni frågar fel frågor. Man bygger inte umgängen. De finns redan. Det ni borde fråga er är hur ni ska hjälpa er målgrupp och göra det dem älskar att göra.”

Mark kallar det för “elegant organization. Och Jeff menar att om vi journalister ska försöka konkurrera med “mediahus” som Facebook och liknande, så bör vi journalister också försöka hjälpa vår omgivning att organisera sin information så att de kan organisera sig själva. Och om det är så, att vi ska det, så krävs det att vi helt och hållet omdefinierar vilka vi är och vad vi gör.

Kunde inte ha sagt det bättre själv 😉

PR-verktygen hoppar över media. Företagens kunder i fokus.


Marketing is conversation. Conversation is relations. Marketing is relations. Marketing is relations with public. Public relations is marketing. Internet is social. Media is social. Social media are social media. Social media are marketing tools. Social media are PR tools. PR is Social media marketing. Social media marketing is content marketing. And content marketing is sharing. Sharing is conversation. And conversation is marketing.

Eller?

Är något av ovan nämnda påståenden felaktiga? Om så inte är fallet, eller om åtminstone de allra flesta överensstämmer med verkligheten, så kan vi snabbt dra slutsatsen att olika kommunikativa discilpliner som PR, Marknadsföring, mfl, har aggregerat i en enda stor smältdegel. Inte särskilt nytt för er som rör er i kommunikationens framkant kanske. Men rätt utmanande för de som står med fötterna djupt nerkörda i någon av nämnda discipliner.

Låt mig få ge er ett exempel inom den disciplin, eller rättare sagt den fd disciplin, som ligger mig varmast om hjärtat – nämligen PR (Public Relations).

För inte så länge sen såg Vocus-ägda PRWeb’s web-sajt ut som den nedan.

PR-verktygen hoppar över media
Januari 2006 beskrev de sin verksamhet relativt traditionellt:
“The recognized leader in online news and press release distribution service for small and medium-sized businesses and corporate communications.

Deras USP var då “online press release distribution”.

Augusti 2007 förskjöts fokus mot mer “visibility”:
“PRWeb, the leader in online news and press release distribution, has been used by more than 40,000 organizations of all sizes to increase the visibility of their news, improve their search engine rankings and drive traffic to their Web site.”

Idag – Augusti 2009 – har de tagit ännu ett steg, ett ganska stort steg mot… “marketing” och “customers”:

“Drive traffic to your website and reach millions of potential customers. “

“Ideal for PR & Marketing Pros and Small Business Owners, PRWeb will help you: Attract new customers. Increase publicity for your business. Drive sales. Increase visitors and traffic to your website”.

PR-verktygen hoppar över media

Inte konstigt att Joe Pulizzi, strateg inom “content marketing” och grundare av Junta42, listar PRWeb som en av de 42+ “social media marketing tools”. För ta en titt på PRWeb’s förstasida, och läs verksamhetsbeskrivningen ovan igen. Inte är det väl PR? Det är väl mer “marketing”? Eller är det sak samma?

Därom tvista de lärde, helt klart är i alla fall att PRWeb tillsynes verkar ha släppt journalisterna och media vind för våg, och istället helt fokuserat sig på att skapa förutsättningar för deras kunder (företagen) att med den sociala webbens goda minne nå sina kunder direkt.

Journalisterna? De hänvisas att möta företaget på samma sociala plattformar som de valt att möta sin publik/marknad på. Väkommen.

Ser fram emot en fortsättning. För det här börjar bli riktigt intressant 🙂