“Engagement” – what everyone’s talking about but no one shows


What struck me during this year’s PRSA International Conference in Orlando was that almost none of the 100+ pr practitioners that I met, did what everyone was talking about. Almost none of the sponsors of the conference, who’s offering pr-tools, really offered what the speakers was talking about. Almost none of the speakers, I heard, recommended the pr-tools that the sponsor offered. Isn’t that a great paradox? Or/and just a shift?

So what was everyone talking about? “Engagement” of course. Engage with the people that matters. Find them, listen to them, understand their needs, serve them and treat them as humans, because they are humans, like everybody else. Not once in a while. But continuously – 24/7.

They were talking about engagement with influential people. Particularly about people with more influence than others. Some of them are (still) journalists. But these day, many of them are thought leaders, customers, industry spokesmen, blogers, and others, or a mix of these as well.

Words and phrases like “conversation”, “social media”, “share”, “followers”, “trust”, “transparency” and others, all of them intimately connected with the concept of “engagement”, were on everyone’s lips as well as on banners, magazines, give aways.

I think Pitchengine’s ad, in the program sheet, described the situation pretty well:

“I have listened to the same social media presentation over and over again. I have heard the word “engagement” 27 times today. What I need is the real thing.”

Unfortunately – I think Pitchengine stumbled at the finish line when the company claimed to deliver the entire solution as “the real thing”. Because they don’t. Maybe they  should have written: “What I need is to show engagement”, and also offer that kind of platform?

But Pitchengine offers a sharing platform for content. Maybe one of the hottest on the market right now. And invites their audience to “create your own media empire”. Great! But where’s the real engagement thing?

Marketwire, Businesswire, Cision, PRNewswire, Vocus, Meltwater Press, Mymediainfo – they’re all stucked in their solutions in terms of mediadatabases and distributionslists. Some of them, like Meltwater Press and Cision (Cision Influence), have added (or will add) value to the profiles of the targets, in form av their social preferences and previous works. And that’s great, as well! But – still – where’s the real engagement?

As a matter of fact, all of these companies (still) offer their clients “management tools” with which they can organize and manage their “target groups”. Most of them are offering monitoring services to let their clients get an idea of what’s going on out there. Some of them are brilliant, like Traackr, which let their customers to find their most powerful influencers.

But – then again – what happens with the real engagement, in terms of understand and serve this VIP’s, based on what they’re saying and eventually asking for?

As far as I can see and understand, the real engagement take place in communities and networks, not in or as a result of “management tools”?

Chris Brogan – one of the key speakers at the conference, and the author of “Trust Agents: Using the Web to Build Influence, Improve Reputation and Earn Trust” recommend his audience to use Google Reader to build their “listening stations”. Exactly what Eric Schwartzman, co-author of “Social Marketing to the Business Customer”, did during his Social Media Boot Camp work shop.

Chris Brogan says in his book:

“Once you have determined where your community is on the web, or perhaps after you’ve built your own online presence as  a meeting place for a group that doesn’t yet have a place to belong, the next step is to engage a community.
This community may be a loosely joined group of people with individual minds and opinions who share some common interests or passions via their own unique perspective.

Here are five steps to help you reach into your community and learn:

  1. Listen comes first. Pay attention to where people (that matters to you) interact.
  2. Measure the conversations.
  3. Take small steps. The first actions you make shouldn’t be intrusive. You just want the community to know you’re there and you’re friendly. Create opportunities for small, memorable exchanges. Build you profile as someone know by being around and monitoring conversations, recognizing who’s a regular and who makes decisions.
  4. Lead a new initiative. When the time is right and you’re a bit better known, try making a move to bring your self more into the center of things.
  5. Profit! Okay, we’re kidding. But seriously, small, daily action helps. And being inside the right community is a great way to build business, glean insider knowledge, and get an edge in your niche.”

So why do PR practioners insist to organize and manage their fellows rather than engage with them? I just don’t get it.

PRSA Facts:
Chartered in 1947, the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) is the world’s largest and foremost organization for public relations professionals. PRSA is responsible for representing, educating, setting standards of excellence, and upholding principles of ethics for its members and, in principle, the $4 billion U.S. public relations profession.

The PRSA International Conferences are one of the largest and most renowned in the U.S PR industry.

When did you pitch a friend lately?


I really dislike the word “pitch” in the context of PR. To such a degree that I might soon escape from the the entire PR business. And I’ve got almost the same feeling for the phrase “target group”. But – still – this is precisely the phrases that are some of the most frequently used in this business. And I’m truly shocked about that.


According to Wikipedia – the pitch is a part of “selling technique”; it is “a line of talk that attempts to persuade someone or something, with a planned sales presentation strategy of a product or service designed to initiate and close a sale of the product or service.” In the PR business we’re seldom dealing with products and services but the more information.

Oh, yes, I do understand we all would like to tell boastful stories that’s important for us, to the people that are valuable for us as influential people. Therefore we’re trying to “pitch” our story to these people we use to call “target group”.

But – hey – PR’s is all about relations, because excellent relations will give us great outcome, right? And I thought we’ve learned that it’s quite impossible to establish good relations with your audience by persuading? I thought PR was all about listening, understanding and serving? Focus shouldn’t be what we would like to say, but what we think they would like to hear.

And, from my point of view, it doesn’t matter if your audience is your customers or journalists. They need more or less the same approach in this matter. Everybody does.

I had a small chat with a marketer recently. She asked me: “What would you do with these new people that recently started to follow us (our business, news stream) as followers?

I said: “I think you should treat them in the same way in the virtual space as you would do in the physical space: Get to know them better! Try to figure out their needs and wants. Imagine you have a breakfast seminar and a guy showed up as a registered participant. What would you say to this guy? I would say: “Welcome! I’m so glad you could come. You’re journalist, right? (Listen to his answer) Interesting… What can I do for you? (Listen to his answer)… And so on. When you come to know him better, treat him as a friend. Serve him. Because I don’t think you look at your friends as “target groups” and I don’t think you’re trying to pitch them either?”

It makes me think of when I use to ask communicators who did visit their newsrooms. Guess what? They don’t know! They don’t even know how many they are. Think about that for awhile. If your newsroom was your breakfast seminar, you might would have a great breakfast, excellent speakers, informative whitepapers, etc – but you wouldn’t know who’s been there, and how many they were. You was not even there yourself!

But – as mentioned – pitching and target groups talk, is still hot topic in many discussions in different kind of PR groups in various of social networks. Within a couple of PR professional groups on LinkedIn, there are questions like:

“E-MAIL PITCHING: Given journalists’ overcrowded inboxes, does e-mail pitching work anymore? What are your secrets to achieving success with e-mail pitches?” and “Age-old PR dilemma … contact media by phone first or by email first….”

These discussions is all about how to pitch, not if you should pitch at all.

As an answer on the second question above; most of the members did say they use to pitch journalist by phone, or at least follow up their email pitches by phone. Only one of the answers came from a journalist, who said: “Email please…And don’t call to see if the writer got the email. If every pr person called to followup on every news release we would never have time to write a story!”

A couple of days after I’ve been following these discussions, I read an article (in swedish) by a journalist and friend of mine, who said:

“I have come to hate the phone. Not its functions, but it’s ringing and disturbing features.”

Jerry Silfwer, a PR consultant, but also a blogger, just wrote a post: “How not to pitch”. He says:

“Don’t be afraid to pitch me. Please do, I don’t mind. But make sure you email me as an individual and make sure that you’re not blasting me as a part of some obscure list somewhere.”

He gives us some examples what a pitcher forgot regarding av really bad pitch he got earlier:

  • What’s in it for me as a PR blogger? I need to be told that clearly.
  • Browsing your case studies is not a reward for anyone but your company.
  • Clarity. Why pitch me to participate (note: the pitch was regarding a survey) but not to blog about it?
  • How did you get hold of my address? In what email list am I in right now?
  • I have hundreds of other emails calling out for my attention. Why should I bother about this, when it isn’t even a personal email?
  • Don’t be so sure that 5-10 minutes is short for me and don’t thank me for participating before I’ve participated (note: the pitch said: “It only takes about 5-10 minutes to complete…”)

Honestly – I don’t think Jerry would like pitches as he says; I think he would like to be understood, treated with respect and served with great ideas for stories, but not as one of the target group. And from my point of view – that’s not a pitch.

Journalists loves your homepage – but not your newsroom


Yes – Journalists do love your homepage – but not your newsroom. 9 out of 10 are using the homepage in their research. But they can’t find the newsroom. And when they do, it’s not up to date.

It’s pretty clear that the company homepage no longer is, or at least should be, the hub of their communication. We do know that people hanging around all over the web, the social web in particular, where they connect with and get inspired och informed by others. Therefore it’s extremely important for companies to meet, connect and socialize with their audience wherever they are aswell.
But – so far – the homepage still is one of the most natural and common way to get information from the company. This applies to journalists in particular.
According to PRWeek’s Media Survey 2010, 93% of the respondent journalists were using the company home page during the course of their research for a story. Only Google Search were more common, and a not-too-wild guess is that they used Google to find website, don’t you think?

PRWeeks Media Survey 2010

Bulldog Reporter – TEKGROUP International – 2010 Journalist Survey on Media Relations Practices, confirm these facts:

“The importance of corporate website and online newsroom as a preferred source of information for journalists continues over the past year, with nearly 97% of journalists indicating that they use such sites in their work. Nearly 45% of respondents report visits more frequently than once a week, and more than 84% report a visit at least once a month. Busi- ness journalists make greatest regular use of corporate websites and online newsrooms, with 59.2% report- ing visits more than once a week; and fully 87.4% of business technology journalists report such visits once a month or more. The most avid users of corporate websites are online journalists, almost 75% of whom visit corporate websites or online newsrooms once a week or more frequently.”

TEKGroup International Journalist Survey 2011

In previous studies by TekGroup International, they found out the Top 10 Reasons to have an Online Newsroom:
1. Journalists expect a company to have an online newsroom
2. Journalists believe that all companies will have an online newsroom
3. Journalists visit company online newsrooms often to very often
4. Journalists visit both large and small-to-medium sized company online newsrooms
5. Centralized location and 24-hour access of press materials
6. Control and delivery of corporate message
7. Measurement of communication efforts
8. Media request management
9. Social media interaction

This leads us to understand how important it is that the website has a full-blown press room. And just because we would understand what a full-blown press room is, they also examined that matter and came up with Top 20 Elements to have in an Online Newsroom:
1.    Searchable Archives
2.    PR Contacts
3.    News Releases
4.    Background Information
5.    Product Info/Press Kits
6.    Photographs
7.    Help/FAQ
8.    Crisis Communications
9.    Events Calendar
10.    Executive Biographies
11.    Media Credentials Registration
12.    Financial Information
13.    Info/Interview Request Form
14.    News Coverage
15.    Video
16.    Social Media Page
17.    RSS Feeds
18.    Audio
19.    Blog
20.    Twitter Feed

Unfortunately “more than 57% of journalists generally agree that it’s difficult to find press materials that address their interests. What’s more, almost 42% of respondents generally agree that it’s difficult even to find organizations’ online newsrooms.”, says TEKGroup.

TEKGroup International Journalist Survey 2011

And we do know that small to medium sized companies, in particular, are often lacked of resources to create newsroom of these kind. But…

Not anymore. Mynewsdesk has created – and now launched –  a hosted newsroom solution which let you create one of these “full-blown press rooms” both on Mynewsdesk as your homepage, without any developers. Yes – with no technical skills – you can easily set up them by yourself. And – yes – it does include most of the elements mentioned above.

Our marketing department has written a few words about this on their blog. Check it. And try it.

Please note that the studies above are biased. After all TEKgroup International is an “Internet software and services company, develops Online Newsroom and E-business software solutions for the public relations industry”. But, my experiences make me to believe that these reflects the realitiy.

Communication a huge and confusing melting pot


Everybody in communication business talks about it everywhere! The new and ever-changing communication landscape has turned the media industry on its head. The confusion is now complete. Much of what we have learned and become accustomed to is no longer valid. This applies particularly to media, journalism, public relations, marketing, and sales. The professionals within each of these fields are either desperately holding on to their old identities, or are groping around for new ones.

The role of journalists is questioned. Previously clear concepts such as “journalist” and “journalism” have become blurred. The same goes for “media”. What is a media today? And “PR” … what is PR? It’s obviously something else today than it was yesterday. And what about “marketing”…

“Markets (and marketing) are conversations” as the Cluetrain Manifesto puts it. Conversations are based on relationships. Just like PR. Because PR’s is all about relationships, right? It’s all about relationships with both the market and those who influence it, including journalists. However, since all consumers now have access to almost exactly the same “tools” and methods as traditional journalists, it seems like the market has in some way also become the journalists. The market represents a long tail of new journalism and new media that perhaps has the greatest influence on a company’s market and might perhaps be their key opinion leaders. “Put the public back to public relations!” as Brian Solis put it long ago.

People have started to talk to each other in social media at the expense of, or sometimes in tune with, traditional media. They’re no longer writing letters to editors. They would rather publish their news ideas directly on the Web. Media consumption, and production, publishing, packaging and distribution in particular, have rapidly moved in to the social web. And both the PR and Marketing communicators are following, or are at least gradually beginning to do so.

As the market moved to the web, and the web has become social, marketing communication has become “social” too. Companies have started to talk directly with their market. And I mean “talk”, not pushing out information. Campaigns with no social component become fewer and fewer. “Monologue” ad banners, with decreasing CTR and increasing CPC, are becoming less acceptable. Google revolutionized with Adwords, Adsense and PPC. Press releases written by former journalists synchronized with Adwords and presented as text ads, turned things upside down.

Aftonbladet has been very successful with advertorials where only a small ad-mark distinguishes the ad from an article produced by journalists. This method is about as successful – and deceptive – as “product placement” in TV and film. That method has gone from small product elements in parts of a program to a complete sellout of the entire series or film. (In Sweden, think Channel 5’s Room Service and TV4’s Sick Sack.) But what can the television business do when the consumer just fast-forwards past the commercials, or worse still, prefers looking at user-generated TV like YouTube?

What will newspapers do when consumers ignore their banners? They will convert advertising into editorials. Or vice versa: they will charge for editorial features and charge companies to publish content on their platform, without involving any “investigative” journalism.

IDG calls their version of this “Vendor’s Voice”, a medium where companies publish their “editorial material” (it used to be called press information) directly on IDG.se and its related websites. The service is conceived and hosted by Mynewsdesk. It works pretty much like the Apple App Store; it is possible for any media to set up their “channel” (the media) on Mynewsdesk, promote it, and put a price on its use.

Essentially, when companies publish their information in their own newsrooms via Mynewsdesk, they can also easily select any relevant channels for the information in question. The service still has the internal working title “Sponsored Stories”, which today may seem a little funny when that is the exact same name Facebook uses for its new advertising program, where a company pays for people in its network to share information about that company with their own friends.

Isn’t that pretty much what PR communicators strive for? It’s in the form of an ad, but this type of advertising is simply bought communication – just like some PR seems to be – with the purpose to “create attention around ideas, goods and services, as well as affect and change people’s opinions, values or actions…”

But the press release… That’s information for the press, right? Or is it information that is now a commodity, often published in the media, directly and unabridged, much like the “sponsored stories”? Maybe it is information that can reach anyone that might find this information relevant. They might not be the press, but they are at least some kind of journalist, in the sense that they publish their own stories, often in same media as “real” journalists, in platforms created for user-generated content.

Everything goes round and round: side by side are readers, companies and journalists. All collaborate and compete for space and reach.

The causal relationship is as simple as it is complicated. People are social. People are using the Web. The Web has become social. People meet online. The exchange is rich and extensive. The crowd has forced the creation of great services for production, packaging, processing and distribution. These are exactly the same building blocks that have always been the foundation for traditional journalists and the media’s right to exist. Strong competition has emerged, but there is also some  interaction and collaboration.

People have opted in to social media at the expense of the traditional media. They rely on their own networks more and more, which has forced advertisers to find a place in social media too. Traditional ads are replaced by social and editorial versions that are designed to engage or become “friends” with your audience, talking to them as you would talk to friends.

The media are in the same boat and are becoming more social and advertorial. Users are invited to become part of both the ads and the editorials. UGC (user-generated content) is melded with CGC (company-generated content) and even JGC (journalist-generated content). Journalism goes from being a product to being a process characterized by “crowd-sourcing”, before ringing up the curtain on a particular report or story. As the newspaper Accent writes on their site:

“This is a collection of automated news monitoring that we use as editors. The idea is that even you, the reader, will see and have access to the unsorted stream of news that passes us on the editorial board. Please let us know if you find something important or interesting that you think we should pick up in our reporting. ”

This is similar to how companies today present their increasingly transparent and authentic communication in their own social media newsrooms, where the audience is invited to contribute their own experiences and opinions, and partly acts as a source of story ideas for journalists.

All in all, it’s a wonderful, fruitful, but oh-so-confusing melting pot.

Flera marknader = flera konton?


Idag skriver Fritjof Andersson, från “Social Business”, ett inlägg om “Varför ditt företag ska ha flera, nischade konton på Twitter”. Fritjof menar att “om du har ett nischat konto som ger intressenten just den information hen vill ha, rätt paketerad och vid intervall som intressenten gillar – då lyssnar hen. Om du har många oilka produkter eller verksamhetsområden och kommunicerar alla dem via samma konto till flera olika målgrupper så måste kunden själv filtrera informationen, vilket gör den till mindre intressant brus“.
Fritjof skriver att “om du till exempel följs på Twitter av en person som följer 2000 andra konton, men inte är med på den personens twitterlistor, då finns du inte för den personen. Om du däremot har ett nischat konto som ger personen exakt det hen vill ha så kanske, kanske du kvalar in till listan av konton som personen faktiskt lägger tid på att läsa“.

Mina erfarenhter är att ju mer du anpassar dina budskap efter din målgrupp desto mer jobb, men samtidigt desto större chans att målgruppen får den information de önskar. Var gränsen går kan bara du avgöra.

Det mesta bygger förstås på att du känner och förstår din målgrupp. När det gäller Twitter så kan du ju inte välja dina följeslagare. Men du kan ju med fördel välja ut din målgrupp bland såväl dina följeslagare och som alla twitteranvändare i stort. Du kan med fördel välja ut de följeslagare du finner intressanta, följa dem och lära känna dem, genom att engagera dig i det dem har att säga. Och du kan självklart också följa dem du finner intressanta trots att de inte följer dig, kanske i någon förhoppning om att de en dag också väljer att följa dig.

Däremot vill jag inte på rak arm säga att det alltid är “bättre” med fler konton än färre. Jag brukar säga att man får det man förtjänar. Väljer du att skriva om ett nischat ämne, på ett nischat språk, så kommer du med största sannolikhet attrahera en nischad målgrupp. Postar du få och ointressanta tweets, så kommer få att följa dig. Släpper du många ointressanta tweets så kommer ingen annan än din mamma att följa dig. Släpper du några intressanta tweets så kommer du få några följeslagare. Släpper du många intressanta tweets så blir de fler. Börjar du engagera dig i dina följeslagare och ge riktigt bra feedback, så kommer de snart börja älska dig, och du kommer få fler och fler följeslagare.

Är ditt företag verksam inom fler mer eller mindre nischade områden, på fler mer eller mindre nischade marknader, så kan företaget göra klokt i att “borra sig ner” i varje enskild marknad. Genom att tillsätta dedikerade twittrare som sakkunnigt och engagerat kommunicerar om exakt det ämne marknade är interesserad av på dess eget språk, både innehållsmässigt och språkligt. Kanske via flera olika konton. Det kommer förmodligen att ge massor, men också kosta massor.

På MyNewsdesk brottas vi lite med dessa frågor också. Till skillnad från Twitter så skiljer vi på konto och marknad. Vi har skapat förutsättningar för företag att administrera ett eller flera pressrum med ett och samma konto. Exempelvis så har Norwegian, med ett och samma konto, förlagt pressrum till fem olika länder (geografiska marknader) där de är verksamma. De har valt att jobba med för varje enskild marknad dedikerade presskontakter och anpassad information på marknaden språk. Exempelvis finsk information på finska från finsk presskontakt, dessutom taggad i finska geografiska regioner och ämnen. OSV.

Norwegian har skapat pressrum för fem olika marknader/länder.

Norwegians finska pressrum

Ett annat exempel är KGK, som valt att bryta ner sin kommunikation på varumärkesnivå, där man med ett och samma konto skapat pressrum för varje enskilt varumärke, men ändå visat att de ligger under moderbolaget KGK Holding. För varje varumärke har man en dedikerad presskontakt, bilder, pressmeddelanden, nyheter, osv.

KGK har skapat pressrum för varje enskilt varumärke - och knutit dessa till moderbolaget KGK Holdings eget pressrum.

Ett av KGK's varumärken - Hella - har fått ett eget pressrum med för målgruppen dedikerad information och presskontakt.

Båda dessa företag har ansträngt sig till det yttersta för att tillgodose sina målgruppers intressen vad det gäller skräddarsydd information och kommunikation. Vilket har kostat i tid och engagemang, men också givit mycket tillbaka.

Men vi har även många exempel på föreag som finns på många olika marknader, men ändå valt att jobba med ett “one size fits all”-koncept. Samma pressrum, pressmeddelanden, presskontakter, nyheter, bilder, osv, på samma språk för alla. Kostar inte så mycket men kanske heller inte ger så jättemycket tillbaka.

Exakt vilken strategi ditt företag ska jobba utifrån, kan bara ni själva avgöra.

Räckvidd inget med inflytande att göra


Låt dig inte luras av räckvidd när du söker inflytelserika personer på webben. Personer med stora nätverk behöver inte med nödvändighet ha stort inflytande.

Min pappa sa alltid: “Håll dig god vän med de som sitter längst bak i klassen, för det är hos dem du kommer söka jobb.”

Andemeningen var förstås att göra mig uppmärksam på hur viktigt det är med lite attityd, integritet, bångstyrighet, etc, för att komma någonstans här i världen. Men också för att påvisa värdet av goda relationer med de som har, eller kommer att få, makt och stort inflytande.

Sistnämnda har varit ledorden för de som jobbar med PR ända sen de gamla grekerna. Det som dock förändrats under resans gång är det kommunikativa landskapet, opinionsbildarna, och de kommunikativa metoderna.

De som länge har haft störst inflytande på företags och organisationers marknad är den första, andra och  tredje statsmakten. Sistnämnda – de traditionella medierna – har lite slarvigt uttryckt länge varit synonymt med PR.

Men nu, när vem som helst har fått verktyg att uttrycka sig fritt på webben, talar man om en fjärde statsmakt; den skara människor som plötsligt och sammantaget förmodligen har störst inflytande på företags och organisationers marknad, av dem alla.

Cisions Europachef, Peter Granat, säger i en intervju med PRWeek:

“In the social media era the word ‘influencer’ is fast overtaking ‘journalist’, ‘analyst’ or any other ringfenced descriptive term that we were once comfortable with. Influencers are everywhere and they’re not simply confined to journalists – now we have bloggers, tweeters, podcasters; a constantly changing variety of people to whom PR professionals need to reach out. But finding the right influencers on the right channels that make an impact for our clients’ brands can seem like looking for a needle in a haystack.”

Detta är ju minst sagt omtumlande för Cision och liknande bolag vars intäkter till största del och ännu så länge kommer ifrån försäljning av just tillgång till mediedatabaser och utskick med utgångspunkt från dessa.

Branschen skakas ånyo av en omdaning som får stora konsekvenser på alla inblandades sätt att arbeta med PR. I synnerhet de traditionella PR-verktygen som hittills har utgått från att journalister och redaktioner på traditionell media är de med störst inflytande på marknaden, och de enda som är värda att “bearbeta” för att på så sätt nå och skapa goda relationer med sin marknad.

Bortsett ifrån att företag idag med framgång kan skapa goda relationer direkt med sin marknad utan att gå via opinionsbildare, söker nu dessa företag tjänster som hjälper dem att finna dessa nya och inflytelserika personer.

Jag har tidigare skrivit om hur nära nog samtliga sociala tjänster på webben som kartläggar folks uttryck på webben och resultatet därav, kan ligga till grund för att identifiera folks inflytande på företags marknad. Men också om de tjänster som tagit positionen att bygga gränssnitt mot dessa tjänster med syfte att försöka redogöra för vem som hänger ihop med vad och vilka, vad som sägs, till vem, i vilken omfattning och på vilket sätt.

Plötsligt har vi kommit väldigt långt ifrån de klassiska “mediedatabaserna” och “distributionslistorna”. Dessvärre kvarstår ofta den traditionella synen på att inflytande har med räckvidd att göra; där en journalists inflytande förknippas med sitt medias upplaga/täckning, och där nu personer med stora “nätverk”, anses ha större och bättre inflytande, än de med små nätverk.

Detta är en stort misstag.

Brian Solis skriver “Influence is not popularity and popularity is not influence” i ett blogginlägg i höstas. Och fortsätter:

“Over time, our net worth is measured not by the size of our social graph, but our place within it.  As a result, social capital is visualized as influence. It is influence that shapes the agenda of social communities and the resulting activity and conversations that contribute to their resonance.”

I ett inlägg med rubriken: “Digital PR – Trends from 2010 into 2011” skriver Mark Berrryreid:

“It isn’t always the smart move to go to the blogger with the largest reach.”

Utan poängterar istället vikten av engagemang och entusiasm vad det gäller positivt inflytande:

“Investing in the people  (evangelists) who love your brand will create a ripple effect.”

Om PR-kommunikatörer uteslutande strävar efter att nå och bygga relationer med de som har stora nätverk, så riskerar de att missa de som verkligen har inflytande på deras företags marknad.

Jag gillar Wikipedias definition av “Social Influence”: “Social influence occurs when an individual’s thoughts, feelings or actions are affected by other people.”

Stora nätverk kan lätt konstrueras utan att innehålla ett uns av “social influence”.

Människor som verkligen påverkar andra människor, kanske gör det inom en sfär som är irrelevant för dig och din verksamhet?

Kasey Skala på SocialMediaToday är kritisk till den allmänna uppfattningen att människor med stora sociala nätverk också skulle ha stort inflytande. Han skriver i inlägget “Does online influence matter?” att:

“Mr. Social Media Expert/Consultant/Guru might know a little something about the online space, but does he really have any influence on which brand of cereal I’m going to buy? Absolutely not. Keep in mind, outside your little social bubble, the vast majority of people in the real world have no clue who you are, nor do they care about your opinion.”

Journalisters inflytande härrör ofta till det media de jobbar för, och den status de har på mediet ifråga. Vilket inte på något sätt spegler hur många följeslagare journalisterna ifråga ev har på Twitter där deras tweets inte sällan även rör frågor av privat karaktär, som vida skiljer sig från deras professionella sfär.

Det är därför märkligt att exempelvis Cision listar de mest inflytelserika journalisterna på tjänsten “Journalisttweets” med utgångspunkt från Klout. Klout säger sig kunna mäta just dessa journalisters “inflytande” med utgångspunkt från 35 olika variablar tagna från deras konton på Twitter, och numer även Facebook. Men vad säger egentligen detta om journalisternas verkliga inflytande?

Liksom Kasey så har jag inget ont att säga om Klouts verksamhet, men kommunikatörer som vill skapa relationer med inflytelserika människor inom deras intressesfär gör sig en rejäl björntjänst om de går efter “Klout score”.

Lika förbryllad blir man av det faktum att 61% av de tillfrågade journalisterna i PRWeeks Media Survey 2010 har blivit pitchade på Facebook. För hur många av de 79% journalister (enligt undesökningen) som har ett konto på Facebook, har det av professionella skäl? Och hur många vill bli pitchade den där? Något som inte framgår av undersökningen.

Läs också “Are marketers overestimating the impact of influencers?” och “Your Followers Are No Measure of Your Influence“.

Pressinformation på Facebook – hot eller möjlighet?


Journalister vill inte bli pitchade på Facebook. Det är heller ingen källa till press- eller företagsinformation. Det framgår av PRWeeksMedia Survey 2010 där 43% av de tillfrågade journalsiterna i USA blivit pitchade via sociala nätverk. Trots att de inte vill det.

Information om och från företag säger sig åtminstone dagstidningsjournalisterna hellre få direkt ifrån företagens hemsidor (90%), med hjälp av Google sök (82%), direkt kommunikation med PR-ansvariga (79%) eller från webbaserade pressinformationstjänster (opt in) (36%). Trots det använder 33% av journalsiterna generellt sett sociala nätverk i sin research. Men bara ett fåtal genom att bli ett “fan” verkar det som.

Frågan är om Facebook är rätt plats att för dig som PR-kommunikatör att möta journalister på? Att förmedla sin pressinformation på? Och i så fall hur?

Den klassiska frågan från kommunikatörer nu för tiden är huruvida de ska använda social media i sitt PR-arbete, och i så fall hur?

För många är det närmast en självklarhet, för andra helt otänkbart. Mitt korta och generella svar på frågan är att om du som kommunikatör vill skapa goda relationer med ditt företags marknad (och målgrupp) så bör du först lyssna på den för att förstå dess behov och önskemål. Och sen börja engagera dig när och där du får indikationer på att målgruppen mottaglig för dialog och utbyte.

Det är dock långt ifrån säkert att hela din målgrupp är social på webben, eller ens får information från sociala medier. Och även om den är det, så är det inte alls säkert att den är intresserad av information eller en dialog med ditt företag där, eller någon annanstans. Men eftersom människor idag i allt större utsträckning söker sig till webben för socialt utbyte, inte sällan i sk sociala medier, så är sannolikheten ganska stor att man också kan bedriva framgångsrik PR i dessa sammanhang, trots allt.

Det fina med den sociala webben är att du som PR-kommunikatör på ett betydligt effektivare sätt nu än tidigare kan bygga bra relationer direkt med din marknad, och inte nödvändigtvis via “språkrör” som journalister. ”Put the public back to public relations” som Brian Solis uttrycker det i sin bok med samma namn. Dessutom har alla dina intressenter som väljer att ventilera sina åsikter ett väldigt stort inflytande på varandra.

Men i detta gytter av relationer med inflytande på vandra, har det förmodligen aldrig varit viktigare, och kanske mer gynnsamt, att slå vakt om just dina viktigaste opinionsbildare; de som har störst inflytande på ditt företags marknad.

Journalisten har (fortfarande) ett mycket stort inflytande generellt sett. Så pass stort att man som PR kommunikatör gör klokt i att slå vakt om och tillgodose dessa och andra nyckelpersoners (key influencers) intressen mer än någonsin.

Frågan är vilka behov och önskemål dessa personer har? Frågan är var de finns, var de är mottagliga för information och ev utbyte? När? Och hur?

Även om du som kommunikatör kan konstatera att din marknad finns på Facebook, och att du därför dragit igång en Facebook-sida, så kvarstår frågan huruvida journalisterna och andra av dina viktigaste nyckelpersoner finns och är intresserade av din närvaro där?

Enligt PRWeeksMedia Survey 2010 så har 79% de tillfrågade journalisterna ett konto på Facebook, och 61% av dem har blivit pitchade den vägen. Men hur många är egentligen mottagliga för pitchar i detta sammanhang?

Min tro är att de flesta journalister väljer att endast visa en del av sin profilinformation. Vilket betyder att de endast kan få meddelanden från sina vänner. Således krävs det av dig som kommunikatör att du först bli vän med journalisten för att kunna pitcha henne. Men om man får tro PRweeks undersökning rätt, så vill ingen av de tillfrågade dagstidningsjournalisterna bli pitchade på Facebook. Det framgår när de svarade på frågan: “Vilka av följande media vill du att PR-kommunikatörer använder när de pitchar dig?”


För rent krasst; hur många journalister finns på Facebook av profesionella skäl? Enligt undersökning ovan använder 33% av dem sociala nätverk generellt sett som verktyg för research. Som del av denna research vet jag att en del av dem väljer att bl a följa företag och liknande på just Facebook. Vilket betyder att de måste bli ett “fan” eller “like” som det numer heter. Vilket blir lite knasigt då en journalist som vill “bevaka” ex Sverigedemokraterna på Facebook måste “gilla” dem för att följa dem.

Knasigt blir det också när journalisten inser att företagens uppdateringar ofta är riktad till företagets kunder med budskap anpassade därefter.

För när Chadwick Martin Bailey och iModerate Research Technologies frågade 1.500 personer varför de hade valt att gilla företag på Facebook, så framgår det att majoriteten av företagets “fans” är just kunder, eller liknande.


När PRWeek frågar journalisterna i samma undersökningen “på vilka sätt de vanligtvis får information om ett specifitk företag”, så visar det sig att hela 92% av journalisterna hämtar information från företagen från företagens hemsidor. Ingen önskar få den från Facebook.

Av detta kan man dra slutsatsen att Facebook kan vara ett utmärkt sätt att möta och interagera med sina konsumenter och liknande. Men kanske inte det bästa sättet att nå ut till journalister och liknande.  Men även om det inte är det bästa sättet, så kanske det trots allt finns anledning att erbjuda journalister och liknande det dem efterfrågar även på Facebook. (I synnerhet för det fåtal som nöjer sig med en Facebook-sida som sin hemsida.) För likväl används de sociala nätvärken allt oftare för research.


Journalister önskar bra uppslag till nyheter och reportage; rå och kärnfull information, som snabbt och sakligt svarar på frågorna vad, när, av vem, hur och varför?

En variant, som vilat på MyNewsdesks skrivbord en tid, är att ge dig som PR-kommuniktör möjlighet att synkronisera din befintliga kommunikation med journalister under en dedikerad flik på Facebook-sidan; eget ”rum” för journalister där de får sitt lystmäte tillgodosett enligt ovan.

Pitchengine.com var en av de som först förverkligade den möjligheten. Jag har personligen inga höga tankar om att lägga kommunikation utanför statusuppdateringarna där aktiviteten är som störst, men heller inte negativ, då detta kanske är den hittills bästa lösningen, trots allt.

Ni journalister, PR-kommunikatörer, och liknande – vad anser ni?