Excel doomed as media relations manager tool


Social networking seems to be the best way to find, get in touch, and communicate with your buddies, no doubt about that. 750 million active users on Facebook, and recently a huge investment from Google to win the network battle, says something about that. Millions of discussion forums of all kind. People are truly connected to each other of thousands of reasons. And communities make perfectly sense for millions of people in millions of contexts. Not least professional. PR in particular. Communicators flock to networks, craving for likes and followers. Journalists as well. To meet their audience.

But what’s happening in the business of media relations in this amazing era of communication? Not much! An excel sheet seems to be the main tool for communicators, and journalists refer to their overloaded inboxes.

I had a great meeting with a PR communicator a few weeks ago. We were discussing the best way for her to find and organize her contacts. And not least get in touch and exchange experiences with them.
My prejudices became incorporated. She was working with an excel sheet. And as far as I’ve understood it is more of a rule than an exception. A wild guess says that 8 out of 10 of PR communicators are doing so.

Not the best media relations manager tool in the world - but the most common?

 

I recently run into a post on “The DIY PR blog – handle your own PR” which began with the sentence: “When you are doing your own PR it’s very important to have a system in place to track all of your pitching outreach efforts.” One of these “systems” was:

“Excel spreadsheet – Start an Excel spreadsheet media list to track all of your outreach efforts. You can have different tabs for each type of outlet – one for magazines, one for websites, one of local/regional media, etc. You could even set one up for editorial calendar postings that you find. Be sure to include the outlet, name, email, phone and any other relevant notes. Every time you communicate with someone make note of it in the “notes” column. Then, once a week or once a month (depending on timing of the outlet and your follow-up needs), go through each tab to be sure you are staying on top of it all.

The communicator I met said to me that’s exactly how she was dealing with media relations.

She said to me that she knew the most important journalists, and what they’re covering and writing about. She’s finding her contacts out of basic research of media. She’s making notes about their needs and wants in her sheet, and based on that she’s sharing her stories by phone and e-mail.

She said:
“As a matter of fact media relations isn’t much different from your personal relations; you’re trying to find out who you’d like to play with, and then start contribute with your life experiences based on what you’ve learned they and you have in common; your social objects.”

I said:
“Yeah, I agree, but you don’t organize your personal contacts in an excel sheet, right?

She started to laugh and said:
“Oh no… Facebook is taking care of that.”

We both realize that Excel isn’t primarily a communication tool. Not even assisted with an e-mail client.

So what would be the best place for communicators to keep and organize their most influential contacts like journalists etc? And vice versa.

Newswires like Cision? It says to be “the world’s largest database of media contacts with all of the information you need to uncover the influencers that matter”. Sounds great but the journalists (so called “target group”) are not engaged. Cision is not an engagement platform. It might even be a spam tool if used indiscriminately.
Facebook? Well, communicators (on behalf of their companies) might have a page and/or a group to meet and discuss with their audience (end customers, etc), but when it comes to media relations, they sometimes would like an exclusive exchange with one or a few of their journalist contacts. LinkedIn? Oh yes, that’s a great professional network. But hard to share content, and still linked to you personally.
Salesforce? It’s not a network on both terms, right? Hard to get a proper community with mutual exchange.
Google+? Maybe – we don’t know yet. Easy to synchronize with your G-mail contacts and create different circles of important people. But the communication is still widely open, and not content driven as the communicator often wants it to be.

And so on…

None of these and others seems to completely fit the communicators and journalists needs and wants when int comes to media relations?

What would you say about a network for journalists and communicators to exchange info and experiences with each other on both terms? I’m talking about a service that allows communicators to find their most influential people on the web, add them to their contacts lists, invite them to a network where they can organize them and communicate with them exclusively. Not least – a tool that allows journalists to find, follow, and send requests to their sources? A network based on the community that has been existing for many years, but still have great potential to flourish with new web service technologies.

How do your media relations look like, when it comes to find, organize and communicate with your contacts?

Please – feel free to respond to some questions in this survey. It just take a minute of your time, and I will send you the summary later on.

Journalists loves your homepage – but not your newsroom


Yes – Journalists do love your homepage – but not your newsroom. 9 out of 10 are using the homepage in their research. But they can’t find the newsroom. And when they do, it’s not up to date.

It’s pretty clear that the company homepage no longer is, or at least should be, the hub of their communication. We do know that people hanging around all over the web, the social web in particular, where they connect with and get inspired och informed by others. Therefore it’s extremely important for companies to meet, connect and socialize with their audience wherever they are aswell.
But – so far – the homepage still is one of the most natural and common way to get information from the company. This applies to journalists in particular.
According to PRWeek’s Media Survey 2010, 93% of the respondent journalists were using the company home page during the course of their research for a story. Only Google Search were more common, and a not-too-wild guess is that they used Google to find website, don’t you think?

PRWeeks Media Survey 2010

Bulldog Reporter – TEKGROUP International – 2010 Journalist Survey on Media Relations Practices, confirm these facts:

“The importance of corporate website and online newsroom as a preferred source of information for journalists continues over the past year, with nearly 97% of journalists indicating that they use such sites in their work. Nearly 45% of respondents report visits more frequently than once a week, and more than 84% report a visit at least once a month. Busi- ness journalists make greatest regular use of corporate websites and online newsrooms, with 59.2% report- ing visits more than once a week; and fully 87.4% of business technology journalists report such visits once a month or more. The most avid users of corporate websites are online journalists, almost 75% of whom visit corporate websites or online newsrooms once a week or more frequently.”

TEKGroup International Journalist Survey 2011

In previous studies by TekGroup International, they found out the Top 10 Reasons to have an Online Newsroom:
1. Journalists expect a company to have an online newsroom
2. Journalists believe that all companies will have an online newsroom
3. Journalists visit company online newsrooms often to very often
4. Journalists visit both large and small-to-medium sized company online newsrooms
5. Centralized location and 24-hour access of press materials
6. Control and delivery of corporate message
7. Measurement of communication efforts
8. Media request management
9. Social media interaction

This leads us to understand how important it is that the website has a full-blown press room. And just because we would understand what a full-blown press room is, they also examined that matter and came up with Top 20 Elements to have in an Online Newsroom:
1.    Searchable Archives
2.    PR Contacts
3.    News Releases
4.    Background Information
5.    Product Info/Press Kits
6.    Photographs
7.    Help/FAQ
8.    Crisis Communications
9.    Events Calendar
10.    Executive Biographies
11.    Media Credentials Registration
12.    Financial Information
13.    Info/Interview Request Form
14.    News Coverage
15.    Video
16.    Social Media Page
17.    RSS Feeds
18.    Audio
19.    Blog
20.    Twitter Feed

Unfortunately “more than 57% of journalists generally agree that it’s difficult to find press materials that address their interests. What’s more, almost 42% of respondents generally agree that it’s difficult even to find organizations’ online newsrooms.”, says TEKGroup.

TEKGroup International Journalist Survey 2011

And we do know that small to medium sized companies, in particular, are often lacked of resources to create newsroom of these kind. But…

Not anymore. Mynewsdesk has created – and now launched –  a hosted newsroom solution which let you create one of these “full-blown press rooms” both on Mynewsdesk as your homepage, without any developers. Yes – with no technical skills – you can easily set up them by yourself. And – yes – it does include most of the elements mentioned above.

Our marketing department has written a few words about this on their blog. Check it. And try it.

Please note that the studies above are biased. After all TEKgroup International is an “Internet software and services company, develops Online Newsroom and E-business software solutions for the public relations industry”. But, my experiences make me to believe that these reflects the realitiy.

18% av Internetanvändarna köpt nyheter på webben


65% av Internetanvändarna i USA har betalat för innehåll från webben. 18% av dessa nyhetsrelaterat material. Detta enligt en undersökning av The Pew Internet Project där drygt 1.000 amerikanare intervjuats per telefon under oktober och november 2010. 755 av dem använde Internet och blev representativa för undersökningen ifråga.

Värt att nämna är att Internetanvändarna som köpt innehåll från webben, har betalat i snitt 10 dollar per månad för det (några extremanvändare undantagna). Vad de 18% har betalat för det nyhetsrelaterade materialet framgår inte. Men jag antar att det inte överstiger ovan nämnda 10 dollar. Snarare tvärtom.

Intressant är ockås att de som köpt nyheter framför allt är höginkomsttagare med en lön på mer än 75.000 dollar per år. Mer än dubbelt så många av sistnämnda hade köpt nyhetsrelaterat material från webben i jämförelse med de som “bara” tjänar mellan under 49.999 dollar per år. Med nyhetsrelaterat material menas en dagstidning, annan tidning, artikel eller rapport.

Rapporten är inte särskilt unik, men ändå intressant, då den ånyo ger oss indikationer på vilken viljan är att betala för nyhetsrelaterat material från webben, och att just detta är något som media fortfarande försöker förstå och testar. Huruvida 18% av Internetanvändarna är mycket eller lite låter jag vara osagt. Men undersökningen ger mig ingen anledning att ändra min tro att media lär få fortsatt problem med att ta betalt för sina redaktionella alster, så att det lämnar ett litet bidrag till fortsatt verksamhet.  Konkurrensen av billigare (läs gratis) och/eller minst lika bra, om inte bättre (ny) media, är fortfarande för stor. Men 18% är ändå 18% och jag är säker på att många tolkar detta som (ytterligare) bevis för att det faktiskt går att ta betalt för nyheter på nätet.

Pressinformation på Facebook – hot eller möjlighet?


Journalister vill inte bli pitchade på Facebook. Det är heller ingen källa till press- eller företagsinformation. Det framgår av PRWeeksMedia Survey 2010 där 43% av de tillfrågade journalsiterna i USA blivit pitchade via sociala nätverk. Trots att de inte vill det.

Information om och från företag säger sig åtminstone dagstidningsjournalisterna hellre få direkt ifrån företagens hemsidor (90%), med hjälp av Google sök (82%), direkt kommunikation med PR-ansvariga (79%) eller från webbaserade pressinformationstjänster (opt in) (36%). Trots det använder 33% av journalsiterna generellt sett sociala nätverk i sin research. Men bara ett fåtal genom att bli ett “fan” verkar det som.

Frågan är om Facebook är rätt plats att för dig som PR-kommunikatör att möta journalister på? Att förmedla sin pressinformation på? Och i så fall hur?

Den klassiska frågan från kommunikatörer nu för tiden är huruvida de ska använda social media i sitt PR-arbete, och i så fall hur?

För många är det närmast en självklarhet, för andra helt otänkbart. Mitt korta och generella svar på frågan är att om du som kommunikatör vill skapa goda relationer med ditt företags marknad (och målgrupp) så bör du först lyssna på den för att förstå dess behov och önskemål. Och sen börja engagera dig när och där du får indikationer på att målgruppen mottaglig för dialog och utbyte.

Det är dock långt ifrån säkert att hela din målgrupp är social på webben, eller ens får information från sociala medier. Och även om den är det, så är det inte alls säkert att den är intresserad av information eller en dialog med ditt företag där, eller någon annanstans. Men eftersom människor idag i allt större utsträckning söker sig till webben för socialt utbyte, inte sällan i sk sociala medier, så är sannolikheten ganska stor att man också kan bedriva framgångsrik PR i dessa sammanhang, trots allt.

Det fina med den sociala webben är att du som PR-kommunikatör på ett betydligt effektivare sätt nu än tidigare kan bygga bra relationer direkt med din marknad, och inte nödvändigtvis via “språkrör” som journalister. ”Put the public back to public relations” som Brian Solis uttrycker det i sin bok med samma namn. Dessutom har alla dina intressenter som väljer att ventilera sina åsikter ett väldigt stort inflytande på varandra.

Men i detta gytter av relationer med inflytande på vandra, har det förmodligen aldrig varit viktigare, och kanske mer gynnsamt, att slå vakt om just dina viktigaste opinionsbildare; de som har störst inflytande på ditt företags marknad.

Journalisten har (fortfarande) ett mycket stort inflytande generellt sett. Så pass stort att man som PR kommunikatör gör klokt i att slå vakt om och tillgodose dessa och andra nyckelpersoners (key influencers) intressen mer än någonsin.

Frågan är vilka behov och önskemål dessa personer har? Frågan är var de finns, var de är mottagliga för information och ev utbyte? När? Och hur?

Även om du som kommunikatör kan konstatera att din marknad finns på Facebook, och att du därför dragit igång en Facebook-sida, så kvarstår frågan huruvida journalisterna och andra av dina viktigaste nyckelpersoner finns och är intresserade av din närvaro där?

Enligt PRWeeksMedia Survey 2010 så har 79% de tillfrågade journalisterna ett konto på Facebook, och 61% av dem har blivit pitchade den vägen. Men hur många är egentligen mottagliga för pitchar i detta sammanhang?

Min tro är att de flesta journalister väljer att endast visa en del av sin profilinformation. Vilket betyder att de endast kan få meddelanden från sina vänner. Således krävs det av dig som kommunikatör att du först bli vän med journalisten för att kunna pitcha henne. Men om man får tro PRweeks undersökning rätt, så vill ingen av de tillfrågade dagstidningsjournalisterna bli pitchade på Facebook. Det framgår när de svarade på frågan: “Vilka av följande media vill du att PR-kommunikatörer använder när de pitchar dig?”


För rent krasst; hur många journalister finns på Facebook av profesionella skäl? Enligt undersökning ovan använder 33% av dem sociala nätverk generellt sett som verktyg för research. Som del av denna research vet jag att en del av dem väljer att bl a följa företag och liknande på just Facebook. Vilket betyder att de måste bli ett “fan” eller “like” som det numer heter. Vilket blir lite knasigt då en journalist som vill “bevaka” ex Sverigedemokraterna på Facebook måste “gilla” dem för att följa dem.

Knasigt blir det också när journalisten inser att företagens uppdateringar ofta är riktad till företagets kunder med budskap anpassade därefter.

För när Chadwick Martin Bailey och iModerate Research Technologies frågade 1.500 personer varför de hade valt att gilla företag på Facebook, så framgår det att majoriteten av företagets “fans” är just kunder, eller liknande.


När PRWeek frågar journalisterna i samma undersökningen “på vilka sätt de vanligtvis får information om ett specifitk företag”, så visar det sig att hela 92% av journalisterna hämtar information från företagen från företagens hemsidor. Ingen önskar få den från Facebook.

Av detta kan man dra slutsatsen att Facebook kan vara ett utmärkt sätt att möta och interagera med sina konsumenter och liknande. Men kanske inte det bästa sättet att nå ut till journalister och liknande.  Men även om det inte är det bästa sättet, så kanske det trots allt finns anledning att erbjuda journalister och liknande det dem efterfrågar även på Facebook. (I synnerhet för det fåtal som nöjer sig med en Facebook-sida som sin hemsida.) För likväl används de sociala nätvärken allt oftare för research.


Journalister önskar bra uppslag till nyheter och reportage; rå och kärnfull information, som snabbt och sakligt svarar på frågorna vad, när, av vem, hur och varför?

En variant, som vilat på MyNewsdesks skrivbord en tid, är att ge dig som PR-kommuniktör möjlighet att synkronisera din befintliga kommunikation med journalister under en dedikerad flik på Facebook-sidan; eget ”rum” för journalister där de får sitt lystmäte tillgodosett enligt ovan.

Pitchengine.com var en av de som först förverkligade den möjligheten. Jag har personligen inga höga tankar om att lägga kommunikation utanför statusuppdateringarna där aktiviteten är som störst, men heller inte negativ, då detta kanske är den hittills bästa lösningen, trots allt.

Ni journalister, PR-kommunikatörer, och liknande – vad anser ni?

Social media bästa källan till social media


Om du, som marknadskommunikatör, tycker det är svårt att lista ut hur du bäst använder webben, i synnerhet den sociala, i din kommunikation, så kanske jag kan trösta dig med att du inte är ensam.

Enligt färsk undersökning från Creative Group, som e-Marketer snappat upp, tycker 65% av de tillfrågade marknadscheferna (i USA) att det är en utmaning att försöka hålla sig ajour med de möjligheter/trender som den sociala webben erbjuder. Fattas bara! Nog finns det ett antal självklara sk “no brainers” på vad man bör göra och inte. Men med tanke på hur snabbt och nyckfullt deras marknad rör sig på nämnda webb så hyser åtminstone jag en viss ödmjukhet inför deras uppgift.

Det jag dock skulle vilja ta fasta på, något som e-Marketer också gjort, är sättet ovan nämnda respondenter försöker hålla sig uppdaterade på hur social media förändras och utvecklas. Till min stora förvåning och bestörtning kan jag konstatera att fysiska konferenser och seminarier är den vanligaste källan till att hålla sig uppdaterad. 23% av respondenterna springer på dessa fysiska möten, medan bara 14% använder sig av sociala nätverk som Twitter, Facebook eller LinkedIn, och bara 7% av bloggar.

I mina öron låter detta helt galet, främst av två skäl: 1) Det enda riktigt bra sättet att försöka förstå hur den sociala webben fungerar, är att själv börja använda den. 2) Informationsutbytet på den sociala webben är mångfalt bättre (inte minst kostnadseffektivare) alla kategorier på webben än i den fysiska världen.  Med två förbehåll; att de finns människor som vant sig vid, är skickliga på, och endast behärskar det fysiska mötet, samt att det fysiska mötet absolut har kvaliteter som inte går att få på webben.

Oavsett sistnämnda så är det min absoluta rekommendation till marknadskommunikatörer att de drar ner på de fysiska eventen till förmån för användning av den sociala webben för att få information, förkovran, inspiration, etc – om de måste välja. Liksom alla relationer så tar de lite tid att bygga, men när så väl skett så har man mångfalt tillbaka.

Barn och föräldrar umgås på Facebook – istället?


En undersökning av Retrevo visar att 48% av föräldrarna i USA är kompisar med sina barn även(?) på Facebook. Retrevo – e-handelsplats för tech-prylar – är bara nyfikna på hur ungdomar använder sociala medier och vilka prylar som bäst kan tillgodose deras (och i viss mån deras föräldrars) önskemål och behov.

Men undersökningen har också blåst liv i diskussionen huruvida sociala medier konkurrerar med eller kompletterar den fysiska sociala kontakten med sina nära och kära. På senare tid har det framgått att den “moderna” föräldern försöker förverkliga sig själv på alla plan, som kärriär, utseende, intellekt, etc, inte sällan på bekostnad av kontakten med sina barn. Det är inte svårt att tänka sig att några kommentarer på Facebook skulle stilla föräldrars dåliga samvete i frågan, men heller inte omöjligt att samvaron på Facebook mellan föräldrar och deras barn skulle kannibalisera på den fysiska kontakten, kanske t o m tvärtom, stimulera till ökad fysisk samvaro. Jag satsar min peng på sistnämnda. Och kanske är det också det Retrevo tänker göra.

Intressant från undersökningen är också att bara 47% av föräldrarna talar med sina barn när de misskött sig. Många straffar istället sina barn genom att beröva dem det de förmodligen älskar mest: 22% av föräldrarna svarade att de skulle förbjuda dem att se på TV, 18% förbjuda dem att använda Internet och 12% att umgås i sociala medier.

Betträffande sistnämnda så skulle ju det i så fall innebära att de heller inte kan umgås med sina föräldrar där, men det kanske inte spelar någon roll då hälften av alla föräldrar i alla fall inte skulle prata med dem enligt undersökningen… Nu blev det snurrigt 🙂

73% av USA’s internetanvändare är sociala


Den sociala webben fortsätter att växa. En undersökning – “2010 Social Media Matters Study” – av BlogHer och iVillage visar att hela 73% av USA’s internetanvändare loggar in på sociala media minst en gång i veckan. Och inte nog med det, det visade sig också att deras dagliga mediekonsumtion också blivit mycket mer social än tidigare. Studien visar bl a att nästan lika många av USA’s internetanvändare besöker Facebook (47%) som att se på TV (55%). Vilket får anses som mycket uppseendeväckande för ett TV-land som USA. Bara 22% läste en tryckt dagstidning dagligen. Ungefär lika många som besöker andra sociala nätverk än Facebook.

Med anledning av den uppmärksammade händelsen att Facebook gick om Google i antal besök för några månader sen, så är det intressant att konstatera att “websök” fortfarande är det överlägset populäraste sättet (92% av USA’s internetanvändare) att få information om produkter som underlättar köpbeslut. Men att bloggen ändå växer i betydelse i frågan (53% av USA’s internetanvändare).

“The days of relying on one source for information are over,” kommenterar Jodi Kahn, VD på iVillage, undersökningen.